Yates and Others

Fred Blakeney

Fred Blakeney

Male 1939 - 1981  (41 years)

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  • Name Fred Blakeney 
    Born 20 Dec 1939  Vermilion, Illinois Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Gender Male 
    Died 6 Apr 1981  Vermilion, Illinois Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Buried Bock Cemetery, Westville, Vermilion, Illinois Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Person ID I6647  Yatesville History & Genealogy
    Last Modified 21 Sep 2011 

    Father Charles "Tip" Blakeney,   b. 29 Aug 1901, Vermilion, Illinois Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 23 Jan 1975, Vermilion, Illinois Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 73 years) 
    Mother Ethel Stevens,   b. 4 Apr 1907, Vermilion, Illinois Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 5 Oct 1987, Vermilion, Illinois Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 80 years) 
    Married 26 Aug 1934  Vermilion, Illinois Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Family ID F3310  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

  • Headstones
    blakeney,fredi6647_head.jpg
    blakeney,fredi6647_head.jpg

  • Notes 
    • Next, I questioned my grandfather Stevens in order to find more information concerning my maternal-ancestors. "Well" he said, "I can't tell you too much about the Stevens family except they came very early to Illinois from Maryland where they had settled after coming over from Germany." "Did they take part in any Indian fights or wars?" I asked. "I don't know about the Indian fights," he replied, "but your great-great grandfather, Byrd Stevens, was first Lieutenant of Company D of the l25th Regiment of Illinois Volunteers during the Civil War. His son, William, that was my father, also fought in the Civil War. See there on the wall, Mark, hangs a framed record of their company. That sword and gun you have were carried by your great grandfather Stevens during many Civil War battles. Now you see why your mother insisted that you buy a blue, not a gray, Civil War cap when this new fad started."

      "Yes, she told me, but didn't you or your father ever see an Indian?" No, I'm afraid not, Mark" he answered. "But did you know that, I once went from Illinois to Nebraska in a covered wagon?" No, tell me about it," I prompted. "Well, there's not much to tell. You see we started out on August 24, l872, this day that I was one month old. We arrived in Nebraska one month later, according to my mother's account. Although the entire family made the trip in three or four wagons and planned to stay permanently, we remained only one winter. It was a severe one, mother said, and everyone was thankful when spring came and opportunity to return to Illinois." Back in Vermillion County as a young man, Grandfather Stevens worked in the mines and the mining companies' stores. At the various social events of the booming Grape Creek mining community, he began courting a young woman Mandie McArdle. In 1906, after a courtship of buggy rides and revival meetings, the young couple was married. Born to this couple were two daughters, Ethel and Babe. Both attended Jenkins School and later were graduated from Westville High School. Ethel, the elder daughter, and Charlie Blakeney were married in 1934. I, their first son, was born in St. Elizabeth Hospital on July 3, 1935. Fred, my brother, is twelve years old today.