Yates and Others

William Blevins

William Blevins[1]

Male Abt 1745 - 1805  (~ 60 years)

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  • Name William Blevins 
    Nickname Colonel 
    Born Abt 1745  Pittsylvania, Virginia Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Gender Male 
    Died 18 Oct 1805  Sullivan, Tennesse Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Person ID I4540  Yatesville History & Genealogy
    Last Modified 8 Mar 2020 

    Family Ann Morrell,   b. 25 Feb 1751,   d. Jan 1818  (Age 66 years)  [1
    Married 24 Aug 1771  Virginia Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Children 
     1. Catherine Blevins,   b. 1771
     2. Milly Blevins,   b. 1771
     3. William R. Blevins,   b. 1774, Virginia Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 27 Dec 1854, Johnson, Tennesse Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 80 years)
     4. Abigail Blevins,   b. 1776, Virginia Find all individuals with events at this location
     5. Sarah Blevins,   b. 1777, Virginia Find all individuals with events at this location
     6. John R. Blevins,   b. 1778, Virginia Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 11 Aug 1843, Tennesse Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 65 years)
     7. Elizabeth Blevins,   b. 1780
     8. James Blevins,   b. 1781
     9. Clara Blevins,   b. 1783
     10. Walter Blevins,   b. 1785
     11. Gatewood Blevins,   b. 1790, Sullivan, Tennesse Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 1868, Independence, Arkansas Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 78 years)
     12. Nancy Blevins,   b. 1794
     13. Martha D. Blevins,   b. 1796
    Last Modified 6 Feb 2021 
    Family ID F2450  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

  • Notes 
    • From: Lance Blevins [mailto:lanceblevins@bellsouth.net] Sent: Friday, August 07, 2009 12:15 PM To: Ron@yatesville.net Subject: RE: Proposed Change: William "Colonel" Blevins (I4540) Ron, Yes, that is the cemetery. There is another old Blevins cemetery about 1/4 mile away up on a ridge in the Cherokee National Forest. I located it several years back. It is grown up and hard to find. I also located what is supposed to be the cemetery for William " Colonel" Blevins in what is now called the Shipley Cemetery on the banks of the south fork Holsten River. It's just over the Holsten mountain from Shady (Crandull). There is also an African American section with a historical marker in this Shipley cemetery, as they were slave holders (as was his son William R.). I could not find the Colonel's head stone, but did find his son's, John R. Blevins. I also located the "Blevins plantation house" nearby. Supposedly, it is the Colonel's house according to a book on the history of Sullivan county. It is very close to the cemetery. I think it is on the national register, but not sure. It is a 2 story log home, but has been covered over in lap siding and painted. It overlooks a flat stretch of land along the river, called "the flats" . It was a ceremonial place for the Cherokee and a lot of graves were dug up there in the early 20th century and are now supposedly stored at the Smithsonian. It is said that the Colonel and the Blevins family were tight with the Indians and when a lot of the settlers were killed during an uprising along the Holsten river, they left the Colonel's family alone. This may have had something to do with the Colonel being a long hunter in the area earlier on with the Walden party, and the fact they shared alliances during the Rev. War and Lord Dunmore's War. I don't think anyone has been able to locate records indicating that William was actually a "Colonel" . Plantation owners were often called "Colonel". Sometimes they would sponser a local militia and be given the honorary title as well. I think there is a record somewhere that he may have been over some local men that were mustered up for duty, but nothing that would confer the title "Colonel". He was awarded the land grant of 600 acres or so on the south fork of the Holsten, so he must have been cited for some service. There is a good chance he is the William Blevins listed as being present as witness with Daniel Boone to the signing of the Sycamore Shoals Treaty with the Cherokee chief Dragging Canoe, which is nearby in present day Elizabethton, Tn. The treaty opened up a huge tract of land for settlement and gave birth to the "lost state" of Franklin. Probably way too much info, but you never know what someone might be interested in. I will get the photo copy out to you.
      Lance

  • Sources 
    1. [S88] GEDCOM File : db-fondren.ged, 12 Mar 2008.