Yates and Others

David Morgan

David Morgan

Male 1721 - 1813  (92 years)

Personal Information    |    Notes    |    All    |    PDF

  • Name David Morgan 
    Born 12 May 1721  Christiana, New Castle, Delaware Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Gender Male 
    Also Known As "The Great Indian Fighter" 
    Died 19 May 1813  Marion, West Virginia Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Person ID I351  Yatesville History & Genealogy
    Last Modified 28 Aug 2021 

    Father Col. Morgan Morgan,   b. 1 Nov 1688, Glamorganshire, Wales Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 17 Nov 1766, Berkeley, Virginia Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 78 years) 
    Mother Catherine Garretson,   b. 16 May 1692, New Castle, Delaware Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 16 May 1773, Berkeley, Virginia Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 81 years) 
    Married 1713  New Castle, Delaware Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Family ID F279  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

    Family Sarah Stevens,   b. 17 Oct 1726, Lancaster, Pennsylvania Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 15 May 1799, Marion, West Virginia Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 72 years) 
    Married 1745 
    Children 
     1. Capt. Morgan Mod Morgan,   b. 20 Dec 1746, Allegany, Maryland Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 31 Oct 1829, Marion, West Virginia Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 82 years)
     2. James Morgan,   b. 6 Apr 1748, West Virginia Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 3 Mar 1840, West Virginia Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 91 years)
     3. Evan T. Morgan,   b. 1 Mar 1753, West Virginia Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 18 Mar 1850, West Virginia Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 97 years)
     4. Elizabeth Morgan,   b. 1755, West Virginia Find all individuals with events at this location
     5. Zackquill Morgan,   b. 8 Sep 1758, West Virginia Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 27 Feb 1834, West Virginia Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 75 years)
     6. Stephen Morgan,   b. 14 Oct 1761, West Virginia Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 30 Nov 1850, West Virginia Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 89 years)
     7. Sarah Morgan,   b. 1765, West Virginia Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 1791  (Age 26 years)
     8. Catherine Morgan,   b. 16 Jan 1769, West Virginia Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 30 Apr 1848, West Virginia Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 79 years)
    Last Modified 14 Jan 2022 
    Family ID F274  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

  • Notes 
    • "Golden Meadows" - David Morgan House One of the oldest cabins in Berkeley County is the present kitchen section of the house. The house was built circa 1745 by Col. Morgan and sons for his son, David Morgan. David became famous as an Indian fighter, and along with Jacob Prickett and others, built Prickett's Fort.

      The source for this information comes from the website work ofKelley Lee Ward found in 2009 at:

      http://www.geocities.com/kward79/index.html?20096

      "David Morgan stood six feet, one inch tall, weighed about 190 pounds, powerfully built, and had black hair and black eyes. He had a large scar on his cheek that he had gotten when he was soldiering with Braddock's army. His contemporaries say that he was one of the kindest people and the best neighbor that you could ever have. He was fearless when it came to Indians or wild beasts, and the only time he was ever out-shot was by his young friend JOHN BUNNER. David was not a man to suffer cowards gladly. He liked to talk like the frontiersman that he was, and threw off the genteel speech that characterized both his brothers, Col. Zackwell, and the young Reverend Morgan Morgan. But when the time came for his "company manners and speech" he was more than up for the task. His son said that he was a bit overindulgent with his children.

      When he died, at 93, he was still pretty robust, and most of his hair was still black. He only lost his teeth in extreme old age. When he died, his body was held for five days to allow time for his friends and family from all over to get there. "Slow River Charlie" Nourse went around telling everyone that "If ever things get so bad they can't be fixed, he (David) would put his bones and meat back together and come back and set things to rights." He carved the headstones for both himself and his wife. "He was honest and a first-rate surveyor whose surveys were so good that they are entered in the deed books."

      He was appointed by the colonial Gov. of VA to assist Steven Holsten in making surveys & explorations of the SW part of the state. Later, he was appointed one of the commissioners on the part of the colony of VA to assist George Washington, in 1748, in discovering and establishing the North boundary of Lord Fairfax's estate, which constituted the boundary between Maryland and Virginia. (Mason / Dixon) The monument known as the Fairfax stone, at the mouth of the Potomac River, commemorates their labors.

      He fought under Capt. Chas. Lewis during the French and Indian War. JACOB PRICKETT SR., & DAVID MORGAN, were both among the defenders of Washington's Fort Necessity. (1757) they also fought under Gen. Edward Braddock in the disastrous march on Fort Duquesne {dew-cane}, (9 July 1755) and other important battles of this war.

      "In 1833, George Cox, while sick in bed and remembering the past, told his cousin Abraham Cox, of West Liberty, who was then twenty-four years old, that in May, 1757, his father, Reuben Cox; Garret and Tobias Decker, brothers; DAVID MORGAN, Nathaniel Springer, John Ice, Henry Falls, Samuel Bingaman, and others, trailed about twenty Indians and two Frenchmen from the South Branch of the Potomac River--where these Indians had murdered six white men and carried off another, George Delay--across the Allegheny Mountains and onto Cheat River, where they overtook and skirmished with them, killing seven Indians and one Frenchman." This happened about five or six miles above where the Ice family kept a ferry. Delay was wounded and died of his injuries while being carried across the mountains. Cox goes on to say that his father and DAVID MORGAN, among others, pursued the fleeing French and Indians, to Bingaman Creek, on the West Fork River. Here they lost the enemy's trail. DAVID MORGAN, Nathaniel Springer, Cox and others, then returned home to the South Branch, where they camped for about two weeks at the mouth of Deckers Creek. During this time, they hunted, gathered ginseng, and explored the Deckers Creek valley. (pp. 81; NOW AND LONG AGO) He moved to the mouth of Red Stone Creek, PA, in 1769; staying 2 yrs.
      (Fayette or Washington Co PA? "Redstone now Brownsville" Then he moved to Marion Co., WVA in 1771. He served as a Private in Wm. Haymonds Co., during the Revolution, where they saw action in PA. (Joined 1777) In 1777, called the "Bloody year of the three sevens", there were many British sponsored Indian depredations. Two invasions were made into the Monongahela Valley. According to the "Morgan Bible" David Morgan killed 7 Indians total; earning the title: "The Great Indian Fighter".

      In 1778, aged 57, he arose from a sickbed, where it is said he had dreamed he saw his children running around the fort scalped, and killed 2 Braves who were stalking Stephen, 16, & Sarah, 14. In the violent confrontation, David lost a finger of his left hand and had another one severed when a Brave threw his tomahawk at David's head. There are affidavits of people who claim to have seen a shot pouch made from a Brave's tanned skin. Some claim David skinned one of the Indians. (This is doubtful as he was ill and injured.) Others claim that refugees at Prickett's Fort tanned the Brave, making 2 shot pouches and one girth from the leather; then presented them to David.

      David was one of the builders of Fort Paw Paw. (Rivesville, WV) In the book `Now and Long Ago' written in 1969, by Glenn D. Lough, {pronounced Low} there are a lot of stories about David. In 1785, in one of the few natural clearings in the "Big Shade", Thomas Stone was surprised, killed and scalped by Indians. JACOB PRICKETT SR., found the body. He got together with DAVID MORGAN, JOHN BUNNER and Nathaniel Springer, and "they trailed the savages for two days and nights, to Middle Island Creek, where the trail was lost in a rain-storm." (pp. 39)

      Another story is told of a woman known as `Aunt Sukey Nourse', who, in 1786, was drowned in Paw Paw Creek for being a witch. The story goes that some people's cattle had strangled to death on hair-balls. It was decided that it was of Aunt Sukey's doing, so they tied her up and threw her into the creek, where she drowned. The relater, Keziah Batten Shearer (1776-1872), continued: "David Morgan and some others were mad about it. Most people were glad and said she deserved it because she was a witch." (pps 9-10)

      There was a painting of David as a young man. Where it is or even if it still exists is unknown. HOWEVER, people who had seen this painting said that Francis H. Pierpoint, a great-nephew of David's, and Gov. of VA in 1861-1868, was "the spitting' image of his great-uncle Dave." A representative painting was based on this.

      His son MORGAN was a slave owner. One wonders if the Great One was also. On 12 Oct 1889, a 14 foot tall monument was dedicated to him. It stands on the spot where one of the Indians died. The place had been marked by a dogwood tree that had sprung up there, by its own accord, but after many years it had died leaving only a stump. The family was concerned that future generations would not know the spot where the event occurred, and desired a more permanent marker."