Yates and Others

John Inglis

John Inglis

Male 1707 - 1775  (68 years)

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  • Name John Inglis 
    Born 1707  Scotland Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Gender Male 
    Died 20 Aug 1775  Pennsylvania Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Person ID I30388  Yatesville History & Genealogy
    Last Modified 31 Oct 2015 

    Family Catherine McCall,   b. Abt 1717, Pennsylvania Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 22 Dec 1750, Pennsylvania Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age ~ 33 years) 
    Married 16 Oct 1736  Pennsylvania Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Children 
     1. Anne Inglis,   b. 1737, Pennsylvania Find all individuals with events at this location
     2. Mary Inglis,   b. 1742, Pennsylvania Find all individuals with events at this location
     3. John Inglis,   b. 1743, Pennsylvania Find all individuals with events at this location
     4. Samuel Inglis,   b. 3 Nov 1745, Pennsylvania Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 14 Sep 1783, Pennsylvania Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 37 years)
     5. Catherine Inglis,   b. 1749, Pennsylvania Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 10 Jul 1821, Pennsylvania Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 72 years)
     6. George Inglis,   b. Abt 1750, Pennsylvania Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 1833, Pennsylvania Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age ~ 83 years)
    Last Modified 27 Nov 2021 
    Family ID F10051  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

  • Notes 
    • Catharine McCall, daughter of George and Anne (Yeates) McCall, was born, it is presumed, in Philadelphia, Pa., where she was brought up by her parents, and married October 16, 1736, John Inglis, a native of Scotland, who came to our city from the West Indian Island of Nevis, where he had followed the business of merchants. Mr. Inglis pursued the same career in Philadelphia in partnership with his wife's brother-in-law and cousin, Samuel McCall, Sr., and attained very honorable distinction in the commercial and social relations of life. He was elected a Common-Councilan of our city October 1, and qualified November 11, 1745. January 1, 1747-8, he was commissioned Captain of the First Company of the Associated Regiment of Foot of Philadelphia, of which his kinsman Samuel McCall was chosen Major, and was a fellow-private in the Association Battery Company of Philadelphia of 1756 with Mrs. Inglis's brother Archibald McCall and brother-in-law William Plnmsted.

      During the absence of Collector Abraham Taylor, from 1751 to 1753, he served as Deputy-Collector of our Port. He was added March 13, 1756, to a Commission consisting of Commissary-General Robert Leake, Edward Shippen, Samuel Morris, Alexander Stedman, and his brother-in-law, Samuel McCall, Jr., appointed by Lieut. Gov. Robert Hunter Morris, at the desire of Maj. General William Shirley, "to audit, adjust, and settle the accounts'' of certain owners of horses and wagons, contracted for by Benjamin Franklin and lost in the service under General Braddock, a duty which occupied him for a month. His name, with those of his brothers-in-law, Samuel and Archibald McCall, John and Joseph Swift, Willing, Morris & Co., William Coxe, Hugh Donaldson, John Nixon, and other merchants of Philadelphia, is appended to an ineffectual remonstrance presented to Lieut. Gov. James Hamilton against an Act of Assembly, passed March 14, 1761, "for laying a duty on Negroes and Mulattoe Slaves imported into this Province," the reasons they allege being “the many inconveniencys the Inhabitants have suffered, for some time past, for want of Labourers and artificers, by numbers being enlisted for His Majesty's Service, and near a total Stop to the importation of German and other white Servants," and the “hardships'' they would “Labour under by such a Law taking immediate effect," when it was not in their power to countermand orders already issued for the importation of negroes, or advise their friends of the event. Mr. Inglis signed the Non-Importation Resolutions of 1765.

      He became a Member of the St. Andrew's Society of Philadelphia at its organization in 1749, and succeeded Governor Morris as President of the association. He was one of the four Directors of the First Dancing Assembly of our city, held in 1749 (the other gentlemen being Lynford Lardner, John Wallace, and John Swift), and a constant subscriber to similar balls in later years. He was one of the contributors to the completion of the building of Christ Church, in Philadelphia, in 1739. Mrs. Inglis died in this city, and was buried December 22, 1750, in Christ Church Ground. Mr. Inglis died here also, August 20, 1775, and was buried with Mrs. Inglis. The following obituary notice of him appeared in The Pennsylvania Gazette issued that week:

      "On Sunday morning last, after a lingering and painful indisposition, which he supported with great equanimity, died John Inglis, Esq., of this city, in the 68th year of his age; a gentleman who early acquired, and maintained to the last, the character of a truly honest man. Possessing a liberal and independent spirit, despising everything which he thought unbecoming a gentleman, attentive to business, frugal but yet elegant in his economy, he lived superior to the world, beloved and respected as an useful citizen, an agreeable companion, a sincere friend, and an excellent father of a family." Mr. and Mrs. Inglis had eleven children, probably all born in Philadelphia.

      [Jasper George Yates Extract from the following work [2015 by Ronald E, Yates]:The Descendants of JORAN KYN of New Sweden; By GREGORY B. KEEN; 1913]