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Edmund Pendelton Rogers

Edmund Pendelton Rogers

Male 1762 - 1843  (81 years)

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  • Name Edmund Pendelton Rogers 
    Born 5 May 1762  Caroline, Virginia Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Gender Male 
    Died 28 Aug 1843  Barren, Kentucky Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Person ID I25120  Yatesville History & Genealogy
    Last Modified 16 Jan 2014 

    Family ID F8599  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

    Family Mary Elizabeth Shirley,   b. 3 Oct 1790, Virginia Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 23 Jul 1836, Barren, Kentucky Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 45 years) 
    Married 27 Feb 1809  Kentucky Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Children 
     1. Frances Underwood Rogers,   b. 9 Jan 1810, Kentucky Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 25 Sep 1839, Kentucky Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 29 years)
     2. Mary Shirley Rogers,   b. 10 Nov 1811, Kentucky Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 12 Sep 1841, Tennesse Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 29 years)
     3. John Thomas Rogers,   b. 22 Jan 1814, Barren, Kentucky Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 19 Apr 1881, Barren, Kentucky Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 67 years)
     4. Ann Brown Rogers,   b. 29 Dec 1817, Barren, Kentucky Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 1870, Kentucky Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 52 years)
     5. Henrietta Swearingen Rogers,   b. 20 Jan 1820, Kentucky Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 2 Jun 1875, Kentucky Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 55 years)
     6. Elizabeth Ellen Rogers,   b. 10 Jul 1822, Kentucky Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. Sep 1859, Kentucky Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 37 years)
     7. Edmonia Thomas Rogers,   b. 2 Jul 1825, Barren, Kentucky Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 27 Apr 1882, Kentucky Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 56 years)
     8. Mildred Lavinia Rogers,   b. 24 Oct 1828, Barren, Kentucky Find all individuals with events at this location
    Last Modified 27 Nov 2021 
    Family ID F8598  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

  • Notes 
    • Family Data Collection - Individual Records about Edmund Pendelton Rogers Name: Edmund Pendelton Rogers Spouse: Mary Shirley Parents: George Rogers, Frances Pollard Birth Place: Caroline Co, VA Birth Date: 5 May 1762 Marriage Date: 27 Jan 1809 Death Place: Barren Co, KY Death Date: 28 Aug 1843

      Family Data Collection - Births about Edmund Pendelton Rogers Name: Edmund Pendelton Rogers Father: George Rogers Mother: Frances Pollard Birth Date: 5 May 1762 County: Caroline State: VA Country: USA

      Kentucky Marriages, 1802-1850 about Edmond Polly Rogers Shirley Spouse 1: Rogers, Edmond Spouse 2: Shirley, Polly Marriage Date: 19 Jan 1809 Marriage Location: Kentucky Adair County

      U.S. and International Marriage Records, 1560-1900 about Edmund Rogers Name: Edmund Rogers Gender: Male Birth Year: 1762 Spouse Name: Mary Shirley Spouse Birth Year: 1791 Number Pages: 1

      U.S., Sons of the American Revolution Membership Applications, 1889-1970 about Edmund Pendleton Rogers Name: Edmund Pendleton Rogers SAR Membership: 44549 Birth Date: 5 May 1762 Birth Place: Caroline, Virginia Death Date: 28 Aug 1843 Death Place: Barren, Kentucky Father: Mother: Frances Pollard Rogers Spouse: Mary Shirley Rogers Children: Ann Brown Rogers Winston

      Edmund Pendleton Rogers Birth: May 5, 1762 Caroline County Virginia, USA Death: Aug. 28, 1843 Metcalfe County Kentucky, USA Family links: Spouse: Mary Shirley Rogers (1790 - 1836)* Children: Frances Underwood Rogers Beauchamp (1810 - 1839)* Mary Shirley Rogers Trabue (1811 - ____)* John Thomas Rogers (1814 - 1881)* Ann Brown Rogers Winston (1817 - 1869)* Ann Brown Rogers Winston (1817 - 1870)* Henrietta Swearingen Rogers Beauchamp (1820 - 1875)* Elizabeth Ellen Rogers Beauchamp (1822 - 1859)* Edmonia Thomas Rogers (1825 - 1882)* Mildred Lavinia Rogers Ray (1828 - 1906)* *Calculated relationship Burial: Rogers Beauchamp Cemetery Edmonton Metcalfe County Kentucky, USA Created by: Nahm Record added: Jan 27, 2007 Find A Grave Memorial# 17712036

      Edmund Rogers by Lewis Collins in 1847, 4 yrs after E Rogers died HISTORY OF KENTUCKY, by Lewis Collins, and J.A. & U.P. James, published 1847. Reprinted by Henry Clay Press, Lexington, Ky., 1968, pp. 175-176 [Barren County].

      EDMUND ROGERS, one of the pioneers of the Green river County, was born in Caroline county, Virginia, on the 5th of May, 1762. He served as a soldier in the memorable campaign of 1781, in his native State, which resulted in the capture of Cornwallis. He was in the battles of Green Springs, Jamestown, and at the siege of York. For these services he refused to apply for a pension, although entitled under the acts of congress. It was the love of his country's liberty and independence, and no pecuniary reward, which induced him to fight her battles. He immigrated to Kentucky in 1783, and became intimate with most of the early pioneers. He possessed a remarkable memory, and could detail with accuracy up to the time of his death, all the important events of the Indian wars and early settlement of Kentucky. He had enjoyed better opportunities to learn the history of these transactions than most persons, in consequence of his intimacy with General George Rogers Clark (his cousin), and captain John Rogers (his brother), and captain Abraham Chapline, of Mercer, in whose family he lived for years. Mr. E. Rogers was the longest liver of that meritorious and enterprising class of men who penetrated the wilderness of Kentucky, and spent their time in locating and surveying lands. It is confidently believed that he survived all the surveyors of military lands south of Green river. He began business as a surveyor in the fall of 1783, in Clark's or the Illinois grant as it was called, on the north side of the Ohio River, opposite to Louisville. In the spring of 1784, his operations were changed to the military district in this State, on the south side of Green river. He made most of the surveys on Little and Big Barren rivers and their tributary streams. Muldrough's hill was the boundary of the settlements toward the south-west in Kentucky, when Mr. Rogers commenced surveying in the military district. He settled upon a tract of land, upon which he afterwards laid out the town of Edmonton in Barren county, in the year 1800.

      He married Mary Shirley in 1808. She died in 1835, leaving seven daughters and one son. In 1840 owing to his advanced age, he broke up house keeping and removed with his single daughters to the house of John T. Rogers, where he died on the 28th day of August, 1843. His remains were taken to his own farm and buried by the side of his wife near Edmonton. In purity of life and manly virtues, Mr. Rogers had but few equals. His intercourse with mankind was characterized by great benevolence and charity, and the strictest justice. He was ever ready to lend a helping hand to the needy and deserving. He raised and educated his nephew, the honorable Joseph Rogers Underwood. He was not ambitious of distinction. He accepted the office of justice of the peace shortly after he settled in Barren county, at the solicitation of his neighbors. Perceiving as he thought, an act of partiality on the part of the court, he resigned his commission at the first court he ever attended, and thereafter persisted in his resolution to hold no office. Mr. Rogers believed that the distinctions made among men, arising from the offices they filled, without regard to their intellectual and moral attainments and qualifications, were often unjust. He therefore spurned official stations and those who filled them, when he thought genuine merit was overlooked, and the shallow and presumptuous promoted. He believed that the fortunes of men, were controlled by things apparently of little moment, and that there was in regulating and governing the affairs of this world, if not the whole universe, a chain of causes and effects or consequences, in which every link was just as important as every other in the eyes of God, although in the estimation of men, they were regarded as very different in importance. To his philosophic mind, he saw what mankind usually calls great things, springing as results from very little things, and he was not disposed to concede that the effect was entitled to more consideration than the cause. He admitted a controlling providence, which operated in a manner inscrutable to man; and hence he never despised what were called little things, and never became great excited with passionate admiration for what were called great things. He admitted there were two great principles at work in the earth, one of good, the other of evil. His affections and his actions were all with the good. In illustration of his idea that apparent trifles were important affairs, he often told the writer that the most consequential events of his life had been the result of his falling off a log and getting wet, in attempting to cross a creek. This happened on the day he left Pitman's station to go into the wilderness south of Green river. He got his papers wet, and was induced to return to the station to dry them, and then to take a new start. Upon his return, he met with a stranger who had a large number of warrants, and made a contract with him for their location. Under this contract he secured the land around Edmonton where he lived, and upon these facts he reasoned thus: "If I had not fallen into the creek, I should not have turned back; if I had not returned to the station, I should not have made the contract by which I obtained the land on which I settled; if I had not got that land I should not have lived upon it; if I had not lived there, I should have been thrown into a different society, and most probably would never have seen the lady I married, and of course, would not have had the wife and children I have; and as a further consequence, the very existence and destiny of those children and their descendants through all coming generations, and the influence they may exercise in families, neighborhoods and counties, depended upon my falling from the log." Mr. Rogers and his brother captain John Rogers made a very singular contract. It was firmly agreed between them, that he who died first, should return from the world of spirits, and inform the other what was going on there. This engagement between the brothers was most seriously entered into. Mr. Rogers has often told the writer, that there could be no such things as visits from the spirits of the dead, and holding intercourse with the living; for said he, if such a thing could be, I know my brother John would have kept and fulfilled his promise. He discountenanced everything of a superstitious character. The motto upon which Mr. Rogers acted through life, was "to do justice, love mercy and walk humbly before God." He often repeated these words as containing man's whole duty. His last illness was of short duration. He was in his perfect mind to the last breath. About an hour before he expired he was seen to smile, and being asked what occasioned it, he said, "he was thinking of the vain efforts of three of the best physicians in the country, to save the life of an old man when his time had come." He died with perfect composure and without a struggle. Inscription. - Mr. Butler, in his History of Kentucky, states, upon the authority of Judge Underwood, that Edmund Rogers had discovered on a beech tree, standing under the margin of the east fork of the south branch of Little Barren river, before there was any settlement south of Green river, the following inscription: "James McCall, of Mecklenburg county, North Carolina, June 8th, 1770." These words were cut in very handsome letters, with several initials of other names. Rogers Cornwallis Clark Chapline Muldrough Shirley Underwood Pitman Butler M'Call = Caroline-VA Mercer-KY Louisville-Jefferson-KY Mecklenburg-NC http://www.rootsweb.com/~kygenweb/kybiog/bar ren/rogers.e.txt**puanani8 originally shared this 16 Jan 2008 story Personal account of Edmund Rogers, written by Lewis Collins in 1847, 4 yrs after E Rogers' death in 1843.