Yates and Others

Amos K. Adkins

Amos K. Adkins

Male 1844 - 1901  (57 years)

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  • Name Amos K. Adkins 
    Born 24 Feb 1844  Crawford, Indiana Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Gender Male 
    Died 26 Apr 1901  Crawford, Indiana Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Buried English Cemetery, Crawford, Indiana Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Person ID I12557  Yatesville History & Genealogy
    Last Modified 26 Aug 2010 

    Father Thomas H. Adkins, Sr.,   b. Abt 1815, Clark, Indiana Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 16 May 1859, Crawford, Indiana Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age ~ 44 years) 
    Mother Margaret Riggle,   b. Abt 1820, Clark, Indiana Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 5 May 1888, Crawford, Indiana Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age ~ 68 years) 
    Married 18 Jun 1838  Clark, Indiana Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Family ID F5294  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

  • Headstones
    Adkins,Amosi12557_head.jpg
    Adkins,Amosi12557_head.jpg

  • Notes 
    • U.S. Civil War Soldier Records and Profiles Name: Amos Adkins Residence: Grantsburg, Indiana Enlistment Date: 10 Nov 1861 Rank at enlistment: Private State Served: Indiana Survived the War?: Yes Service Record: Enlisted in Company K, Indiana 38th Infantry Regiment on 11 Oct 1861. Mustered out on 15 Jul 1865 at Louisville, KY. Sources: Report of the Adjutant General of the State of Indiana National Archives: Index to Federal Pension Records

      Son of Thomas (b. 1815) and Margaret (b. @1821); siblings: Mary E. (b. @1839), James F. (b. @1843; same company), William H. (b. @1846), John S. (b. @1848), Charles (b. @1851), Samuel (b. @1859); age 17 at enlistment in Co. K, 38TH IND INF; 5'10", gray eyes, sandy hair, fair complexion; wounded at Perryville; veteran; mustered out July 15, 1865; married to Sarah E. Adkins; children: Curtis A. (b. June 1885) and Emma G. (b. Aug. 1882); post-Civil War farmer and hardware dealer.

      Date: June 5, 1864

      Author: John Yates

      Addressee: Elizabeth Roberson Yates

      Location: Dallas, GA

      Description/Summary:


      John is writing this letter on Sunday June 5, 1864 from Dallas, GA; this is about 25 miles southwest of Allatoona Mountains, GA, the site of his previous letter. John is taking a serious tone and it saying that it is only through the mercy of God that he now is alive and has the opportunity to write this letter to his family. He has written one letter to her since this battle began 10 days ago when they made this attack on the Rebels and the battle stopped at 9 AM this morning. He can't say how long it will be stopped as they have not learned yet what direction the Rebels have taken and what his unit's response will be one it comes. He says they have not been out of range of the Rebel guns over the last 9 days straight and the last 4 days they have been directly in front of his line. They have lost 3 men out of Companies E., H. and D. and James Gresham of E. has just died of his wounds [this turns out to be not true]; the other 2 are still alive as of this morning.

      John says that he, George Riggle and Tolbert McCraney are mess mates; fixing and eating meals together. [Tolbert will marry John's daughter Samantha so Tolbert is John's future son-in-law but will never know it.] It would appear that A. Adkins [Amos K. Adkins 1844-1901] of the 38th may have been taken prisoner but it is not yet confirmed. They will learn the truth once the train catches up with them as he was driving one of the teams. [Rather than Rail Road this may be a reference to baggage Train which traditionally follows the line troops.] John seems to be saying that he doesn't have an idea when this campaign might end even though it has been a month in progress; he says the hotter the fighting the better as the old saying is that peace will come sooner that way. They hope that in this case that will turn out to be true as everyone is getting war weary but they remain determined to end this Rebellion against the Country.

      John is expressing a thought that he says he will just say he saw a sight this morning he hopes to never see again in his life. The saw men who have been dead for 8 days lying out in the sun and he seems to be describing body gases of decomposition and maggots; he describes them as being full of creepers. The ones that he saw were lying so close to his own lines that he was consumed with the smell of rotting flesh. He is stopping his letter now as the mail is ready to go. He says to give his love to everyone but asks Elizabeth to take the greater portion of it for herself. He only has one more envelope and stamp and is unsure how he will resupply himself; he says he hasn't had a chew of tobacco for a week but found some old trash tobacco this morning and a good side of bacon; the Rebels had buried the bacon in the ground but they found it. PS. He asks to please excuse the hand writing as he has been lying on the ground in the mud and water for the last 48 hours and it was not safe to raise his head during the writing of the letter.