Yates and Others

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151 (SOURCE: BIOGRAPHICAL AND HISTORICAL SOUVENIR FOR THE COUNTIES OF Clark, Crawford, Harrison, Floyd, Jefferson, Jennings, Scott and Washington, INDIANA; John M. Gresham Company, 1889.)

GEORGE W. ROBINSON is a native of Kentucky, and was born Dec. 25, 1830. He is a son of William and Sarah (Lyon) Robinson; the former born in New York in 1774; the latter born in 1764, and died in 1861. The older Robinson came from Ireland in an early day. He served in the Indian wars of the times, and was with Gen. Wayne at the battle of Fallen Timber in 1795, which virtually closed the Revolutionary war, though it had been declared over a decade before. He died in 1853, full of years and full of honors. He had settled in Kentucky, and in 1834 removed to Harrison county, settling in Boone township.

George W., the subject of this sketch, was the youngest of a family of six children. He was brought up on a farm, and received such education as the limited facilities of the county afforded. When the war of the Rebellion commenced he enlisted in Co. K, Fifty-eighth Regiment, Indiana Volunteer Infantry, Sept. 23, 1864, and was discharged June 30, 1865. He was with Sherman in his "March to the Sea," and participated in all the hardships as well as the fighting of the wonderful campaign. He was at the surrender of Col. Joe Johnston, and participated in the grand review at Washington after the war was over.

He then turned his arms into agricultural implements, and resumed farming. He was married April 17, 1856, to Miss Elizabeth Thompson, of Harrison county, and a daughter of Benjamin and Maria Thompson; the former a native of Harrison County, a farmer and an exemplary member of the Baptist Church; the latter, Maria Brown Thompson, was a daughter of Robert Thompson, who was born on the ocean when his parents were in transit to America. He settled in Kentucky, but later removed to Harrison county, Ind.

Mr. and Mrs. Robinson have had twelve children born to them, viz: Ann M., Lemuel C, Benjamin T., William W., Ulysses G., Henry, Ellondor, Cora S., Mary A., George A., James H. and Edgar R. Ann died Aug. 14, 1858; William W. died Feb. 13, 1864, and Henry died March 28, 1868.

Mr. Robinson has a fruit farm of eighty acres of land, which is in a high state of cultivation, yielding much fine fruit. 
Robinson, Edgar R. (I21375)
 
152 (Source: bonnebluadded this on 30 Jun 2008) "Evidently, Thomas Bauman, was a rebel of sorts. He left his family in Oklahoma, leaving them to fend for themselves, moved to English, Indiana, and married another woman. I have been unable to find this 2nd "wife." On September 24, 1898, Thomas was arrested for bigamy, went to court, and served about 1 year in jail for the offense. While I have not found any records to indicate the location, I suspect Corydon, Indiana, is where any records of this arrest would be found." Baumann, Thomas R. (I2574)
 
153 (Source: Carlene Warner via misc e-mail communication with Ron Yates)The Indiana State Board of Health Certificate of Death, Record Number 397, lists name as Catherine Laswell, so one must assume she was known by her middle name. Her occupation is listed as Domestic, which could signify "housewife." Although her husband, David Laswell, was still alive at the time of her death, her son, Edward Laswell, of Cape Sandy, Indiana, was the informant. According to the Certificate, she had tuberculosis for five years or more.

February 29, 1912; Death of Mrs. David Laswell; The death of Mrs. Catherine Laswell wife of David Laswell, of Cape Sandy, formally of Union Township, occurred February 29th at place of residence. Her remains were brought to Pleasant Ridge Cemetery for internment.

She was a life long christian having united with the United Brethren Church at the age of eighteen years. She leaves a husband who is blind, three sons and one daughter living, four children having preceded her in death. Funeral was preached by the writer Rev. J.E. Rowe.

1850 United States Federal Census about Catharine Curl Name: Catharine Curl Age: 14 Birth Year: abt 1836 Birthplace: Indiana Home in 1850: District 45, Harrison, Indiana Race: White Gender: Female Family Number: 859 Household Members: Name Age Richard Curl 42 Mariah Curl 34 Frances Curl 15 Catharine Curl 14 Elisabeth Curl 11 John Curl 9 Dennis Curl 7 Harriet Curl 6 Peter Curl 4 Henry Curl 2 Martin Curl 0 Henry Steepro 23

1860 United States Federal Census about Catharine Currel Name: Catharine Currel [Catharine Curl] Age in 1860: 22 Birth Year: abt 1838 Birthplace: Indiana Home in 1860: Union, Crawford, Indiana Gender: Female Post Office: Grantsburg Value of real estate: View image Household Members: Name Age Richd Currel 54 Maria Currel 44 Catharine Currel 22 John Currel 17 Richd Currel 14 Harriet Currel 13 Peter Currel 12 Henry Currel 10 Martin Currel 9 Clark Currel 7 Palmzra Currel 2 View Original Record View original image

Indiana, Marriage Collection, 1800-1941 about Catharine Curl Name: Catharine Curl Spouse Name: David M. Laswell Marriage Date: 7 Apr 1864 Marriage County: Crawford

U.S. and International Marriage Records, 1560-1900 about Mariah Catherine Curl Name: Mariah Catherine Curl Gender: Female Birth Year: 1837 Spouse Name: David Morton Laswell Spouse Birth Place: KY Spouse Birth Year: 1837 Number Pages: 1

1880 United States Federal Census about Kate Laswell Name: Kate Laswell Age: 43 Birth Year: abt 1837 Birthplace: Indiana Home in 1880: Union, Crawford, Indiana Race: White Gender: Female Relation to Head of House: Wife Marital Status: Married Spouse's Name: David Laswell Father's Birthplace: Virginia Mother's Birthplace: Kentucky Neighbors: View others on page Occupation: Keeping House Cannot read/write: Blind: Deaf and Dumb: Otherwise disabled: Idiotic or insane: View image Household Members: Name Age David Laswell 44 Kate Laswell 43 Sherman Laswell 10 Edward Laswell 6 Martin Laswell 3 Elzada Laswell 1

1900 United States Federal Census about Catherine Laswell Name: Catherine Laswell Age: 62 Birth Date: Jun 1837 Birthplace: Indiana Home in 1900: Union, Crawford, Indiana Race: White Gender: Female Relation to Head of House: Wife Marital Status: Married Spouse's Name: D M Laswell Marriage Year: 1864 Years Married: 36 Father's Birthplace: Virginia Mother's Birthplace: Indiana Occupation: View on Image Neighbors: View others on page Household Members: Name Age D M Laswell 63 Catherine Laswell 62 Edward P Laswell 25 Elsie Laswell 6 Delbert Laswell 4

1910 United States Federal Census about Catherine Laswell Name: Catherine Laswell Age in 1910: 72 Birth Year: abt 1838 Birthplace: Indiana Home in 1910: Ohio, Crawford, Indiana Race: White Gender: Female Relation to Head of House: Wife Marital Status: Married Spouse's Name: D M Laswell Father's Birthplace: Indiana Mother's Birthplace: Indiana Neighbors: View others on page Household Members: Name Age D M Laswell 73 Catherine Laswell 72 Sherman Laswell 40 Jessie L Laswell 20 Catherine Laswell 18 Wayne Laswell 16 Ruth Laswell 9 Edna O Laswell 7 
Curl, Mariah Catherine (I370)
 
154 (Source: Carter County History By Tonia Rose, staff writer Jan. 13, 2010 January 14, 2010 09:43 am) The story of murder and lynching began when Austin Porter, 21, (recorded often incorrectly as Oscar or Ostin) of Elliott County stabbed and killed his wife Charlotte “Lottie” Yates Porter. The two were married in Carter County Jan. 11, 1889. Porter was a teacher and admired by one of his female students. Realizing she was not going to gain his undivided attention, the student went to Lottie and told that Porter had a girlfriend. A Journal-Times reporter recently contacted Lottie's niece, Francis Adams Perry, of Alaska and native of Willard, and asked about Lottie and Porter's relationship. Perry said after the student spread the rumor, Lottie left Porter and moved in with her parents George W. and Perlina McDavid Yates.

“She (student) had lied to Lottie in hopes she would get Austin,” Perry recalled what her friend Eleanor McDavid Brewster of Little Fork told her. “She caused a separation and a man to kill his wife in a passion of love and anxiety, after she refused to come back to him." About 3 a.m. May 26, 1892, Austin went to the home in hopes that Lottie would talk with him through the window. After she refused, he crawled through the window, and in a moment of heated anger, he stabbed Lottie to death as she slept beside their 1-year-old son Albert Sydney. Albert was raised by Lottie's parents and went on to become a physician in West Virginia. He died May 18, 1976, at the age of 85, in Athens Ohio.

According to a ballad written about her death, Lottie's father entered the bedroom as she faintly spoke her last words, “Daddy he killed me.” According to history, Porter watched his wife's funeral from a nearby hillside. With little resistance he soon surrendered to authorities and admitted his guilt. Three weeks later, June 19, an angry mob of more than 100 people marched to Willard, where at midnight, they forced E.K. Railroad engineer Bill Duke to fire up his locomotive and head toward Grayson to the Carter County Jail. Lottie would have turned 19 on that day.

Throughout the trip to Grayson, Duke was ordered not to blow the whistle or ring the bell under the penalty of instant death. While armed with guns, the mob quietly arrived in town and began the one-half mile walk to the jail. The time was about 2 a.m. “I'm gone,” Porter told the jailer as the mob entered the cell. He then begged that the jailer would see to it that his body would be buried next to his wife or beside his sister.

The train arrived at a bridge over Dry Fork in Willard, known as Porter Bridge due to the hanging. Once there, the mob put a clothesline size rope around Porter's neck and tied the other end to the bridge. He moaned and cried aloud, but the only distinctive words were, “O' Lord, have mercy.”

When they pushed him off the bridge the rope suddenly snapped. But that didn't stop the angry mob as they fished Porter from the water and made a new knot. He was left hanging between the bridge timbers and the creek below. At 10 a.m. the body was surrounded by hundreds of men, women and children. According to history, it was a horrible spectacle. Porter was an attractive man, but his death by hanging, showed a man with a distorted face, bulging eyes, protruding tongue and a lacerated neck. Upon arrival of the coroner, the body was cut down and taken to the Willard Depot where an investigation was held and the body was then turned over to his friends for burial.

“The verdict of the jury…”We the jury find…he came to his death by strangulation of a rope thereupon by whom we don't know.” The undisputed feelings of the people were that Porter deserved his fate. (Source: Carter County History By Tonia Rose, staff writer Jan. 13, 2010 January 14, 2010 09:43 am) 
Porter, Austin (I12602)
 
155 (SOURCE: Chrisman Courier November 8, 1945 page 8) Rites here for Mrs. Jane Gunn here last Monday; Mrs. Jane Gunn, resident of Chrisman some 40 years ago, died Saturday, Nov. 3, at Normal. Funeral services were conducted by her pastor, Rev. I.S. Corn, at the Normal Methodist Church Monday morning. The body was interred in Chrisman Woodland Cemetery Monday afternoon, Dr. Carlos Dunagan officiating. Mrs. Gun had lived well into her 93rd year.

Illinois, Deaths and Stillbirths Index, 1916-1947 Name: Jane Gunn Birth Date: 27 May 1853 Birth Place: Washington Co , Illinois Death Date: 3 Nov 1945 Death Place: Limestone, Peoria, Illinois Burial Date: 5 Nov 1945 Burial Place: Chrisman, Edgar, Illinois Cemetery Name: Chrisman Death Age: 92 Race: White Marital Status: S Gender: Female Street Address: 801 S. Morris Street Residence: Bloomington, McClean, Illinois Father Name: Joseph Gunn Father Birth Place: Tennessse Mother Name: Anna Tobman Mother Birth Place: Illinois FHL Film Number: 1984362 
Gunn, Jane (I5714)
 
156 (Source: Clement F. Heverly, Pioneer and Patriot Families of Bradford County, 1770-1800, Vol. 1, Bradford Star Print, 1913 EARLY MARRIAGES, JUSTICES AND MINISTERS IN BRADFORD COUNTY Records From 1820 to 1830

1829 Smithfield's First Public Wedding; The day set apart for the noteworthy occasion had at last arrived, and there was gladness in the log cabin of Elias Needham. The day was to witness the marriage of Constant Williams and Miss Lucy Needham. Accordingly, the house was put in the very best order, and arrangements made for the wedding supper. The affair was to be "secret," and only a few of the neighbors were invited, among whom was Squire Pierce, who was to perform the ceremony. When the company arrived they found the young couple, happy and blushing, in their homespun garbs. After the ceremony had been completed, the festive board was prepared to receive the wedding knickknacks, which were baking in the stone-oven without. These were corn-cakes and baked beans. When all were ready to partake of the extraordinary feast, it was found that the oven had been looted and the company must retire supperless. "Who had done the mischief?" We will explain.

"The secret was not kept, and nearly the whole neighborhood had been posted of the forthcoming wedding. Accordingly, the ox-teams were hitched to sleighs and the people, old and young, brought out and assembled in a neighbor's house nearby. Needham's oven was watched, and when an opportunity offered, the corn-cakes and beans were slipped out and eaten by the merry spirits. In the evening the young people participated in a good, old-fashioned 'shin-dig' to make more complete the memory of the first public wedding in Smithfield. 
Needham, Lucy (I5098)
 
157 (SOURCE: Comments: My great-grandmother was Harriet M. Yates (1831 - 1890). K. Clark has listed her on Wikitree. Just getting started in genealogy, I've spent the most time trying to find Harriet's parents. I notice that most of the Yates that are noted on Wikitree are from states South of New York. Since Harriet's husband, Alonzo was from Mayfield, New York I found there were many Yates living nearby in Montgomery County. I traced their families from Joseph (1645, Leeds, Eng - 1730) Albany,New York. Although, most of Joseph's ancestors soon settled in the Albany / Schenectaty area, many moved on to Montgomery County. So far that has been a dead end so, I have been searching census records to see what Yates could be possible parents. Most of those that left New York ended up in Michigan, but perhaps some settled farther South. Harriet was 1st enumerated in Town of Yates in 1855. Harriet's burial records show her born in Broome County, although census records show her born in Cortland County. I've checked both - possible parents, but no Harriet listed. [I am waiting for records from the Town of Yates (NY), hoping to discover some clues. I grew up there, but spent my adult life in the Chicago area and now am retired in Macon, GA.] It would be good to learn that Harriet's parents continued to Indiana and we were related. I'm sure you have seen this on Benjamin (buried in Dryden, Tompkins, NY), son of Lemuel: http://wc.rootsweb.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=connectville&id=I14350&printer_friendly Also a Benjamin (abt 1805) is enumerated in Harford, Cortland, NY in the 1855 census, with wife Henrietta and children: Marvia A (about 1832), Adalade D (abt 1838) and Martin H (abt 1842). I have created 2 trees (Wayne Woodworth Tree & Harriet Yates Tree) on Ancestry.com, but have not uploaded to GEDCOM, so don't know if you can find them. I have 4 pictures of Harriet. Let me know if you would like me to pass them along. Best regards, Wayne Wayne Woodworth www@3iResearch.com

I appreciate your quick response Ron. I am enclosing 5 pix: 1 of Harriet Yates Woodworth, (2) of Harriet with husband, Alonzo, and 1 with Alonzo and Harriet (on the right) with their daughter, Ella, and son-in-law, Theo. The last one is Willett with Cousin. Willett (my grandfather) was Harriet's son. The pic sez that the cousin is from Michigan. I have not yet identified her, but most likely (at this point) she was a Yates cousin. The picture was taken in Hudson (Lenawee) Michigan. Census records aren't favorable to many Yates in Lenawee at that time. Willett was born 1835 and they look about the same age. I don't see many Yates listed in Wikitree, but perhaps you have an associate specializing in the Michigan lineage you could pass this one on to. I'm also attaching the work-in-progress spreadsheet I have put together. 'Don't know if it's any use to you or not. I have not included the Montgomery County Yates(most of them are on my Yates Ancestry.com tree). Also, did not include Southeast NY or the Albany area. My compliments on all of your efforts. 'Will keep you informed. Wayne ----- Original Message ----- From: Ron Yates To: www@3iResearch.com Sent: Tuesday, September 24, 2013) 
Woodworth, Willett G. (I23866)
 
158 (SOURCE: Crawford Co. Death Records Index, Crawford County Health Department 1899-2002) Burch, Florence C. (I26408)
 
159 At least one living or private individual is linked to this note - Details withheld. Roberson, F.L. (I17479)
 
160 (SOURCE: David Owen's Revolutionary War Service Record; Added by Ronald Yates on 8 September 2009; Added by RogerSowder on 15 May 2009; Originally submitted by cowens4728 to Owens and Mullins Families on 7 Jul 2007)

David Owen was born on 21 September 1759, probably in that portion of Halifax County, Virginia that became Pittsylvania County in 1767. David's father was William Owen II, born ca. 1725 in Virginia, died in Wilkes County, North Carolina, ca. 1787, his mother is not known at this time. In 1772, William moved his family from Pittsylvania County, Virginia to the Reddies River section of Surrey County, North Carolina. In 1777, this area was included in the creation of Wilkes County, North Carolina. William Owen II owned and operated a gristmill on the North Fork of the Reddies River as well as running a plantation consisting of several hundred acres.

William Owen II's, will, dated 28 September 1785, was probated in Wilkes County on 28 January 1788. He left the balance of his estate to his son David, after first bequeathing, to quote his will, "one shillion starling in gold or silver" to his other children - John, William, Thomas, Barnet, Mary Denny (she is the presumed wife of Elijah Denny, although no documentation has thus far been found), Anne Dudley (wife of William Dudley) and Elizabeth Judd (wife of Nathaniel Judd). William also made provision for his grandson, Elisha, first born child of David, to receive fifty pounds upon his coming of age. One of the witnesses to William's will was his nephew, Francis Kearby, son of William's sister, Joanah Owen and her husband, John Kearby. Other than David, his sisters Mary Denny and Elizabeth Judd, little is known of William II's other children.

In the spring of 1779, during the Revolutionary War, David Owen, described as a "true Whig," enlisted in the North Carolina Militia. He, along with three hundred North Carolina militiamen, served under Colonel Benjamin Cleveland at the "Battle of King's Mountain" on 7 October 1780. In this battle, the British and Tories, under the command of Colonel Patrick Ferguson, were soundly defeated. He was also one of the three hundred fifty North Carolinians at the "Battle of the Cowpens" on 17 January 1781, under Colonel Daniel Morgan. In this fight, the British troops under Colonel Banastre "Bloody" Tarleton were forced into a full rout. Most of the British troops were either killed or captured in this engagement, however their commander, Tarlton, escaped. David, along with his brother, Barnet, also served in Captain William Lenoir's company in several engagements in and around Wilkes County. David served in the militia off and on until spring of 1782.

The only physical description known of David Owen is in his Revolutionary War pension records and came from Revolutionary War veteran, Jacob Gabbert of Laurel County, Kentucky. Jacob, in an affidavit, attested to David's service in the Revolution, saying that, although they didn't serve in the same company, he saw David often between 1780 and sometime in the spring of 1782. Jacob said "they had formed an acquaintance over the years" and described David as "an uncommon large man with a tremendous voice."

David's presumed brother-in-law, Elijah Denny, a Revolutionary War veteran, also gave an affidavit. He said that he was "raised" with David in Wilkes County, North Carolina and knew that David served in the army for three years. Elijah also said that he was present at the marriage of David and Winefred Mullins, but could not recollect the exact date other than it was during the war. Elijah was over ninety years old at the time he gave his statement in 1850 and was described by Dr. Adams Crawford, Justice of the Peace and Elijah's son-in-law, as "a man of advanced years, but with a good memory." Elijah died on 26 April 1868, at the reported age of 110. Although some researchers disagree with this age, all agree that he was well over 100 years old when he died.

A marriage bond was issued in Wilkes County, North Carolina, on 16 December 1780, to insure the marriage of David Owen and Winefred Mullins. The pension records suggest they were married on 20 December 1781, however, since the bond was dated a year earlier, the actual date may well have been 20 December 1780. Winefred Mullins was born, probably in Halifax County, Virginia, on 30 March 1766. Although no documentation has been found, all evidence indicates that Winefred was the daughter of Henry Mullins and his wife, who is believed to have been Mary "Polly" Terry. Mary's parents are unknown at this time. Henry Mullins and his family were close neighbors of William Owen II., and his sons, in Wilkes County, North Carolina. According to the 1782 Wilkes County Tax records both families owned acreage along the Reddies River. The 1795-97 Wilkes County Taxables in District No. 10 lists David Owen and his brothers, along with Henry Mullins and his sons, Terry, Spencer and Champness, as having farms close to each other. These Owen and Mullins families are also shown on the 1800 Wilkes County census.

Like many pioneer families, David and Winefred had a large family - twelve boys and one girl. The children were - Elisha, born 9 January 1782, died before 1860, married (1) Lucy Lasswell and (2) Barbara Summers. Wilmouth, born 8 December 1784, died ca. 1870, married John Lasswell on 14 January 1804. Morton, born 19 February 1787, died before 1840, married Elizabeth Farris on 16 January 1806. Martin, born 19 January 1789, died before 1850, married Phoebe Knight on 31 March 1806. Isham, born 12 October 1790, died very young. Samuel, born 29 January 1792, died 1813, never married. Allen, born 24 December 1793, died 28 September 1847, married Mary Kilbourn on 9 November 1815. Webster, born 30 July 1795, died 2 June 1852, married Isabel Cummins. Burton, born 1 December 1798, died 3 April 1840, married Lavincy Riggs. Wesley, born 20 May 1801, died April 1876, married his cousin, Louisa Ann Mullins, daughter of Spencer Mullins. Alfred, born 20 September 1803, died after 1880, married his cousin, Rebecca Mullins, daughter of Champion Mullins. Logan, born 13 April 1805, died 1825, never married. John, born December 1809, died before October 1853.

In the early 1800's, a move of any distance would have been a trying experience, but David and Winefred Mullins Owen undertook a major move, taking their family and belongings from Wilkes County to Kentucky through some of the most rugged and hazardous territory in North Carolina, Virginia, Tennessee, and Kentucky. They left Wilkes County sometime in 1803 or 1804, probably following the trail into Virginia, to the Powell Valley in Tennessee, and then up through Cumberland Gap into Kentucky along the "Wilderness Road." They settled in what is now Rockcastle County. Over the years, David acquired much acreage on the Dix River, Skegg Creek and the Rockcastle River.

It appears that Elijah Denny and his family along with the Mullins families came to Kentucky along with David and his group. The Owens and Mullins families all settled in the same area of Rockcastle County and continued their close association in Kentucky, with both playing an important part in the early development of Rockcastle County. There were several Owens-Mullins marriages in the early years and later intermarriages between cousins. The new families continued using the same names for their many children, thus creating a genealogical nightmare for those of us trying to sort out the Owens-Mullins families in Rockcastle County. David Owens (an "s" was added to the name sometime after 1810) died in 1822 and Winefred died on 26 February 1842. Both David and Winefred are buried in Rockcastle County, but their exact burial sites remain unknown. A marker was placed on Winefred's grave by her son-in-law, John Laswell, who stated in an affidavit that he "carved her name and deth date on her toom stone soon after her deth." The marker has not been found.

In April 1850, according to David Owen's Revolutionary War pension records, the six surviving heirs of David and Winefred filed a pension application. The six were Elisha Owen, Webster Owen, Wesley Owen, Alfred Owen, John Owen, and their sister Wilmouth Owen Laswell. They applied to the United States Pension Office for a pension in accordance with the provisions of an Act of Congress, enacted on 21 July 1836, to benefit Revolutionary War veterans and their widows. To support their claim, the heirs filed various family records, payroll statements from the Comptroller of the State of North Carolina, as well as several affidavits from other Revolutionary War veterans who attested they knew David Owens served in the army during the Revolution. Subsequently, a pension certificate was issued in the names of the heirs in the amount of $80 per annum, retroactive from 21 July 1836, to Winefred's death in 1842, with a lump sum being paid to the heirs. A new certificate was also issued effective from 1842 until sometime in 1853, at which time the certificate was suspended due to the deaths of Webster Owens in June 1852, and John Owens, prior to October 1853. On 22 September 1853, James M. Smith, a lawyer of Mt. Vernon, KY wrote to the executor of Webster Owens' estate in Platte County, MO indicating that he had obtained a pension of $876 for the heirs of Winefred Owens, wife of David Owens. There is no information showing if these funds were ever distributed to the heirs in Platte County. The four remaining heirs in Rockcastle County, Elisha Owens, Wesley Owens, Alfred Owens and Wilmouth Owens Laswell made application in October 1853, requesting that the pension certificate be reinstated. Apparently their request was denied.

One of the interesting documents found in David's pension file has created a puzzling situation. On 4 February 1820, the General Assembly of the Commonwealth of Kentucky approved "an act totally dissolving the marriage of David and Winney Owens." Although this information is in the records, the pension application and other supporting affidavits say that David Owens and Winefred Owens lived together as man and wife until David'd death in 1822.

Another interesting item in the pension file denotes a controversy created when the heirs gave their powers of attorney, at separate times, to two unrelated individuals, Lawyers, James S. Fish and James M. Smith. The two men were to serve as agents to help the heirs secure a new certificate of pension. Evidence shows the controversy arose when Mr. Fish accused Mr. Smith of "fraud and duress" in the names of the four heirs - Wilmouth Laswell, Elisha, Wesley, and Alfred Owens. On 11 October 1853, all four heirs presented an affidavit praising Mr. Smith and stating that he had done no wrong. On the other hand, Mr. Smith made the same accusation against Mr. Fish. In a letter to the Commissioner of Pensions, which was sent along with the affidavit, Mr. Smith said that Mr. Fish had drawn "fraudulent papers" in the names of the four heirs and described Fish as "a violent enemy of mine." Unfortunately, there is no indication in the file as to how this dispute was resolved. David Owen's Revolutionary War Pension Records, over 79 entries, can be found in the National Archives microfilm series, M-804, Roll 1855. (SOURCE: David and Winefred Mullins Owen were the author's G-G-G Grandparents; Charles Sterling Owens - cowens01@charter.net)

(SOURCE: http://www.nose4bs.com/Ky_David_Owen.htm) David Owen served for three years in the North Carolina Militia during the Revolutionary War. He was in Col. Benjamin Cleveland's Company at the Battle of King's Mountain on October 7, 1780. He served under Col. Daniel Morgan at the Battle of Cowpens on January 17, 1781. He also served with Captain William Lenoir in and around Wilkes County, NC.

On December 20, 1780 in Wilkes Co., North Carolina, David married Winefred Mullins, born March 30, 1766 in Halifax Co., Virginia, the daughter of Henry Mullins and Mary Terry. David and Winefred moved their family from Wilkes County to Rockcastle County, KY in 1803.

David Owen and Winefred Mullins had thirteen children, including: Elisha Owen, born January 9, 1782 in Wilkes Co., North Carolina who married Lucy Laswell, born about 1785 in Wilkes Co., North Carolina; Allen Owen, born December 24, 1793 in Wilkes Co., North Carolina, who married Mary Kilbourn, born about 1798 in Pulaski Co., Kentucky; Burton Owen, born December 1, 1798 in Wilkes Co., North Carolina who married Lavincy Riggs, born about 1800 in North Carolina; Wesley Owen, born May 20, 1801 in Wilkes Co., North Carolina who married Louisa Ann Mullins, born about 1802 in Wilkes Co., North Carolina. 
Owen, David (I9476)
 
161 At least one living or private individual is linked to this note - Details withheld. Roberson, H.D. (I3899)
 
162 (Source: finadagrave.com; George Sigler was the son of Isaac W. Sigler and Martha Jane Davis. He was born in Perry County and married Nancy M. Keysacker on October 18, 1866. The couple purchased a farm outside of Eckerty in Crawford County and raised their family there. Father of Sonora Ellen "Dall" (married George Newton), Willard (married Lillie Nulton), Martha (married William St. Clair), Mary E. (died in infancy), and Annie (married Gilbert St. Clair).) Sigler, George Washington (I14412)
 
163 (Source: finadagrave.com; Martha E. Sigler was the daughter of George W. Sigler and Nancy Keysacker, and the sister of Annie Sigler married to Gilbert Sinclair and Willard Sigler who married Lillie Nulton. Martha married William S. Sinclair on September 16, 1893 in Crawford County Indiana. Martha was the mother of Willard, Oscar, Torrence, Iville and Elmer St. Clair. Son Oscar is buried in Pike County with his father William. Martha owned a farm between Birdseye and Eckerty, which is now part of the Hoosier National Forest. NOTE: Despite the fact that the tombstone claims Martha's birth year as 1867, the July 28, 1870 census for her in Crawford County shows she is one year old.) Sigler, Martha Elizabeth (I14407)
 
164 At least one living or private individual is linked to this note - Details withheld. Galbreath, K.B. (I15633)
 
165 (Source: findagrave.com member, janemcash #46778944); Alexander McCracken was born in Caledon, County Tyrone, Northern Ireland in 1749. In the 1770's he worked as a stone mason on the Alexander family estate. In 1782/3 he eloped with a local girl, Margaret Marshall, daughter of Henry Marshall of Derrykintone Cottage.

About a year later, they emigrated to the United States. Their first son, Henry, died during the voyage and was buried at sea. The family continually moved westward, by 1785. Alexander and Margaret settled in Cumberland County, Pennsylvania, where most of their children were born - Sarah, Lillian, William, Robert, James, Alexander, Henry II and Martha. (The 1790 census lists the family in Butler County.) Around 1796 the family moved again, this time to Westmoreland County where four more children children were born - Margaret, John, Jane, and Arthur.

Another move took place around 1806 to Allegheny County, where their last child, Mary 'Polly' was born. As the children became adults they continued to migrate westward, settling primarily in Ohio. By 1820 Margaret and Alexander also moved to Ohio, where they purchased land in Sugar Creek Township, Greene County. Margaret died 19 June 1827 in Xenia, Greene County. Sarah J.Smith, wrote in 1877, "My grandfather (Alexander McCracken) was a great singer. He used to amuse us children from dark til bedtime after he was 70 years old, singing the songs he sang to his wife."

In his later years Alexander lived with his eldest son, William, in Cambridge, Ohio. He died at the age of 102 on 9 September 1851, Cambridge, Ohio. "He was living at the home of his son, William, was in good heath and in active possession of his physical and mental faculties. There were two doors, side by side on the porch, one opening into the kitchen, the other to the cellar stairs. In the dusk he opened the wrong door and stepped off, falling down the stairs and resulting in his death."

Web: Ohio, Find A Grave Index, 1787-2012 Name: Alexander McCracken Sr Birth Date: 25 Apr 1749 Age at Death: 102 Death Date: 9 Sep 1851 Burial Place: Cambridge, Guernsey County, Ohio, USA

Passenger and Immigration Lists Index, 1500s-1900s Name: Alexander McCracken Year: 1776 Place: New England Source Publication Code: 9760 Primary Immigrant: McCracken, Alexander Annotation: Covers era prior to 1855. Compiled from correspondence and monument inscriptions, 17th and, mainly, 18th century. Prepared for the Scottish Genealogical Society. 6,470 emigrants. Source Bibliography: WHYTE, DONALD. A Dictionary of Scottish Emigrants to the USA. Vol. 1. Baltimore: Magna Carta Book Co., 1972. 504p. 2nd pr., 1981. Page: 257 
McCracken, Alexander (I10151)
 
166 (Source: From The Greensborough Patriot, July 31, 1862 - Pg. 3) Deaths; Died. - In the Hospital at Richmond, Va., July 15th, John Watson Yates, from a wound received in the battle before Richmond. The deceased was a native of Guilford, eldest son of Henry Yates, deceased. Soon after the breaking out of the war, Mr. Yates volunteered in Capt. C. C. Cole's Company, and acted nobly his part as a good and faithful soldier. Yates, John Watson (I21858)
 
167 (Source: Info from Jana Buck Hanks; Jana; swmf@meganet.net ; astoop1 25 Jun 2010)

The first records of HUGH and JEREMIAH were found in Fincastle County, VA. They were given land grants by the Loyal Land Company in January 1775. This land was on the New River and later became part of Montgomery County, VA. HUGH and JEREMIAH owned adjoining land. Both of them lived in Montgomery County until after the Revolution. In the spring of 1789, they sold their holdings in Montgomery County BA. No land records for JAMES found in Montgomery County, VA, however he was in service during most of this period. He was in the Army several times but records show that each time he was discharged he returned to an area where HUGH and Jeremiah RESIDES. All three of the brothers were in North Carolina when the 1790 census was taken. They apparently did not remain there very long because HUGH was in Lee County, VA by 1795 and JEREMIAH was in Russell County, VA. These were adjoining counties. At that time both of these counties adjoined Kentucky. On October 20, 1798 EDWARD and ELIZABETH YOUNG sold 96 acres of land to JEREMIAH PATRICK, SR. in Russell County, VA. On March 6, 1798, HUGH PATRICK purchased 200 acres of land from FREDERICK JONES in Lee County, VA. However both had patents to land in those counties acquired by at least 1795.

Family Data Collection - Deaths Name: Jeremiah Patrick Death Date: 1822 City: Magoffin State: KY Country: USA

Family Data Collection - Births Name: Jeremiah Patrick Father: Robert Patrick Mother: Elizabeth Ann Stephens Birth Date: 1738 City: Russell State: VA Country: USA

Family Data Collection - Individual Records Name: Jeremiah Patrick Spouse: Sarah Sally Blair Parents: Robert Patrick, Elizabeth Ann Stephens Birth Place: Russell County, VA Birth Date: 1738 Marriage Place: Rockingham County, VA Marriage Date: 1760 Death Place: Magoffin County, KY Death Date: 1822

Jeremiah Patrick b. 1738 in Maryland and died 1819 in Middlefork, Licking River, Magoffin County, Kentucky off Route 30. He was buried at Etheridge Dyer Cemetery, off RT. 30, Magoffin County, KY; Across from the middle School up to the right on a little hill. He is buried beside Rueben Arnett's grave (See Arnett Family Tree). Rueben's homestead.

While he served in the Revolutionary War he was taken prisoner. He was charged with being an enemy to this country and acting under the commission of the King of Great Britain. Witnesses were brought forth and he was found innocent, but bound to his good behavior for 12 months and fines a sum of 1000 pounds. Jeremiah was born in Maryland, moved to Giles Co. in 1790 then to Russell Co. and in 1810 he moved to Floyd County, Kentucky now Magoffin County, Kentucky. He died soon after he arrived in KY.

He was a farmer and one of the earliest settlers of KY. He married Sarah "Sally" Blair in 1761 in Harrodsburg, VA. Sarah Blair was b. 1741 in VA. Sarah died 1793 in Russell County VA. Sarah was the daughter of Brice Blair. Brice was born in 1770 in Ireland and died 1785 in Penn. (Source: MarthaSmith6281 5 Nov 2011; ancestry.com)

(Source: from research by Diane Dearring, descendent of Blair May; http//homepages.rootsweb.com/~burchett/i/DEARRING/i0000749.htm#i749; DorisMaley345 submitted this to Bays Family Tree on 15 Feb 2009)

Jeremiah Patrick was born 1738. He married Sarah "Sallie” Blair Harrisonburg, Rock Co., VA, ABT 1790. "Jeremiah, according to William Patrick II's manuscript was married in Maryland to Sallie. He moved to Gile Co. VA in 1810 and to Floyd County, KY in 1822. The document says that Jeremiah is buried near Reuben Arnett's on the Middle Fork of Licking River, KY".

He was given a land grant on the New River in what later became Montgomery County, Virginia (brother HUGH lived on adjoining land); moved to Kentucky around 1813 at age 75, following in the footsteps of his brother James, who had scouted in eastern Kentucky while serving with General George Rogers Clark, and had moved there in 1808. They moved their bare necessities on jolt wagons and horses, as the trail into Kentucky was difficult and nearly impassable.

It is believed that Sarah died shortly before the move, as records show that Jeremiah alone sold land in Virginia about that time. They had 14 children; William, Jeremiah Jr., John, Brice, Thomas, Elias, Maston, Polly, Gerusia, Ruth, Sarah, Louisa, Nancy, and Margaret.

His grandson Reuben built a cabin for him on his farm on the Middle Fork of the Licking River. Jeremiah went hunting on the last day of his life and collapsed of an acute gastro-intestinal illness. He signaled his grandson, Reuben, by firing three shots from his gun. He died that day in 1822 at age 84. Jeremiah is buried alone in the Dyer cemetery, Middle Fork near Salyersville, Kentucky. A Daughters of the American Revolution (DAR) marker was added to his grave in 1947. 
Patrick, Jeremiah (I19400)
 
168 (Source: Info from Jana Buck Hanks; Jana; swmf@meganet.net ; astoop1 25 Jun 2010)

The first records of HUGH and JEREMIAH were found in Fincastle County, VA. They were given land grants by the Loyal Land Company in January 1775. This land was on the New River and later became part of Montgomery County, VA. HUGH and JEREMIAH owned adjoining land. Both of them lived in Montgomery County until after the Revolution. In the spring of 1789, they sold their holdings in Montgomery County BA. No land records for JAMES found in Montgomery County, VA, however he was in service during most of this period. He was in the Army several times but records show that each time he was discharged he returned to an area where HUGH and Jeremiah RESIDES. All three of the brothers were in North Carolina when the 1790 census was taken. They apparently did not remain there very long because HUGH was in Lee County, VA by 1795 and JEREMIAH was in Russell County, VA. These were adjoining counties. At that time both of these counties adjoined Kentucky. On October 20, 1798 EDWARD and ELIZABETH YOUNG sold 96 acres of land to JEREMIAH PATRICK, SR. in Russell County, VA. On March 6, 1798, HUGH PATRICK purchased 200 acres of land from FREDERICK JONES in Lee County, VA. However both had patents to land in those counties acquired by at least 1795.

HUGH PATRICK and his wife SUSANNAH _________ died in Lee County, VA and never lived in KY. He purchased land there in 1798 but is on the tax lists beginning with 1795. He is last shown on the Tax lists in 1802. His exact date of death is unknown, but he apparently died between 1802 and 1814. Records in Montgomery County, VA. show that HUGH PATRICK was in the Revolutionary War. He was sworn in Captain JOHN DRAPER's Company, 10 Oct 1779. HIS NAME WAS SPELLED "PATTRICK". IN 1828 a court record in Lee County, VA lists his heirs as follows:

1. JAMES PATRICK m. MARGERY ______ They were in Floyd County and moved to Arkansas.
2. JOHN PATRICK no information
3. ROBERT PATRICK m. BETSY McMULLEN They lived in Floyd County, leaving many descendants and then moved to Arkansas.
4. NANCY PATRICK m. WILLIAM HAMPTON
5. ELIZABETH PATRICK m. JOHN NOE, SR. After John's death in Lee County, VA, ELIZABETH and her children moved to Harlan County, KY. Several of her great grandchildren married into the ARNETT family in Magoffin County, KY.
6. MARY PATRICK m. JOHN SPRATT
7. PRISCILLA PATRICK m. ELIAS BATES
8. DARKEY (DORCAS) PATRICK m. ROBERT REED
9. JEMIMAH PATRICK m. ELIJAH PRATER, JR. on 15 Sept 1832 and they moved to Arkansas.

The above information on HUGH PATRICK and SUSANNAH was given by SHARROLL K. MINIX of Lexington, KY in the PATRICK FAMILY BOOK VOL 1. The following information on WILLIIAM PATRICK was also contributed by Sharroll K. Minix. 
Patrick, Hugh (I19404)
 
169 (Source: Info from Jana Buck Hanks; Jana; swmf@meganet.net; astoop1 25 Jun 2010); SPECIAL NOTE: Info from the PATRICK books Vol. 1 and 2 produced by the Magoffin County, KY Historical Society which gives basic information. Several mistakes found in other family books produced by the same Historical Society; THE PATRICK'S OF EASTERN KENTUCKY compiled and sold by the Magoffin County, KY Historical Society, Salyersville, KY. The PATRICK books were published in 1982; That Patrick book states (with no conclusive proof) that HUGH, JAMES and JEREMIAH PATRICK were brothers. Patrick, Robert (I19403)
 
170 (Source: Lancasterhistory.org: Yeates, Carson Collection, 1700-1874 Wednesday, January 14, 2009 Call number: MG-207 3 boxes 94 folders 1.5 cubic ft. Repository: LancasterHistory.org (Lancaster, Pa.) Shelving Location: Archives South, Side 5

Description: Collection spans period from 1700-1874, covering several generations and a variety of topics, and gives insight into family and local social history. Includes judgment, receipts, estate accounts, correspondence, biographical sketch of Jasper Yeates' grandfather, land draft, land surveys, memos, indentures, extract of will, Commonwealth order, financial records, land agreements, list of books sent to Phineas Bond for binding, certificates with seals, copies of poems, bonds, eviction notices, and a note for subscription shares. Creator: Yeates, Jasper; Yeates, Sarah; Yeates family; Shippen family; Burd family. Conditions for Access: No restrictions. Conditions Governing Reproductions: Collection may not be photocopied. Please contact Research Staff or Archives Staff with questions. Language: English Source of Acquisition: Purchased by the Lancaster County Historical Society.

Related Materials: MG-205 The Yeates, Lancaster County Historical Society Collection; MG-206 The Yeates, Aungst Collection) 
Yates, Carson (I22810)
 
171 (SOURCE: Minnis)

1638: Immigrated to VA as Jone Yates, by John Yates, Lower New Norfolk County.
Greer, George Cabell. Early Virginia Immigrants, 1623-1666. Richmond, VA: W.C. Hill Printing Co., 1912.

1848 COURT: 15 Aug. Administration granted Joane Yates widow on the estate of her late husband John Yates. (Lower Norfolk County, Virginia Court Records: Book "A" 1637-1646 and Book "B" 1646-1651/52, p. 76, ref. 82a, )

1649 Court: Held 1 Oct . Present: Capt: John Sibsey, Mr: Jno: Hill, Mr: Math: Phillips, Mr. Tho: Lambard, Mr: Tho: Browne. Certificate to Joane Yeates widow for 150 acres of land for ye transportation of : Jonathan Bartram, Anne Winn, & Walter Cansington.

(Lower Norfolk County, Virginia Court Records: Book "A" 1637-1646 and Book "B" 1646-1651/52, p. 115, ref. 123,)

1652 LAND: Mrs. Johanna Yates, 300 acs. Low. Norf. Co., page 175. No date [sandwiched between two other entries of 9 Mar 1652. Trans. 6 pers. (Cavaliers & Pioneers, Patent Book 1, Part 1, p, 273)

1652 LAND: Joane Yates, Widdow, 200 acs. Low. Norf. Co., in Eliz. Riv. Parish, 6 Dec 1652, p. 156. Beg. at head of W. Neck branch, which falls into the S, br. of sd. Riv &c. Trans. of 4 pers: Jonathan Barthram, Anne Wynn, Walter Causington, Mary Syarlocke. (Cavaliers & Pioneers, Patent Book 1, Part 1, p, 270)

1653 COURT: Norfolk County, 15 Apr, p. 41b, Joane Yates, widow, appeared and demanded the thirds of land of her late husband. She to have them "together with the Chiefe man'con house thereuppon" for life . . . to bring in inventory of her late husband's estate . . . Dif betw Joane Yates widow, pltf, and Richd Yates, deft, referred to next court.

1656 COURT: Norfolk County, 15 Aug, p. 229, Joane Yeates her marke recorded, viz: The Left eare Wth a square/ Under it , & Slitte on ye Right eare.

John A. Brayton, cp., Transcription of Lower Norfolk County, Virginia Records, Book C, 1651-1656, 2010, pp. 41b, 229.

1658 COURT: Lower Norfolk Co, VA, 16 Nov, Complaint of Jone Yeats Grandmother to orphans of Tho: Horne decd. To ye Court agst their mother in law, for her hard usage of orphans. Thos: Lovell who married who married said widow requested tobe continued until next Court where Lovell promised to bring Orphans for Court to see.

John A. Brayton, cp., Transcription of Lower Norfolk County, Virginia Records, Vol. 1, Wills and Deeds, Book D 1656-1666, Cain Lithographers, Jackson, MS, 2007, p. 180.

1660 COURT: Lower Norfolk Co, VA, 8 Mar, Complaint of Jone Yeats Grandmother to orphans of Tho: Horne decd, now in possession of Thos: Lovell ther father in law, compaint of ill usage of Orphans. Ordered Lovell to make personal appearance before LCol. Tho" Lambert at his house on 8 Mar wth Orphans to syand to censure.

John A. Brayton, cp., Transcription of Lower Norfolk County, Virginia Records, Vol. 1, Wills and Deeds, Book D 1656-1666, Cain Lithographers, Jackson, MS, 2007, p. 288.

1661 COURT: Lower Norfolk Co, VA, 15 May, Thomas Horne has put himself apprentice to Bartholomew Engolbretson/ a cooper being with consent of his grandmother and father in law for a term of five years.

1661 COURT: Lower Norfolk Co, VA, 15 May, Mary Horne an orphan has put herself apprentice to Mr. Wm Carver being with consent of her grandmother and frends for a term of three years. His wife to instruct her according to her knowledge and capacity.

1661 COURT: Lower Norfolk Co, VA, 15 Aug, Mary Horne an orphan living with Mr. William Carver has by petition of her grandmother Johanna Yeates, make choice of ye sd Mr. Carver to be her guardian during her minority.

1662 COURT: Lower Norfolk Co, VA, 15 Apr, ordered that Thomas Lovell deliver up all the estate in his hands belonging to Thomas & Elizabeth Horne being orphans unto Joane Yates/ Widd Grandmother to ye orphans to and for the use of the sd orphans.

John A. Brayton cp., Transcription of Lower Norfolk County, Virginia Records, Vol. 1, Wills and Deeds, Book D 1656-1666, Cain Lithographers, Jackson, MS, 2007, p. 341

1662 COURT: Lower Norfolk Co, VA, 16 Jun, Johan Yates vid. agt. Thomas Lovell.

John A. Brayton cp., Transcription of Lower Norfolk County, Virginia Records, Vol. 1, Wills and Deeds, Book D 1656-1666, Cain Lithographers, Jackson, MS, 2007, p. 345

1662 COURT: Lower Norfolk Co, VA, 15 Aug, cause pending between Johan Yates widow: & Grandmother to orphans of Thomas Horne decd: & Thomas Lovell who married ye relict of sd Horne. Orpkhans to have no part of the thirds of the estate given by one Rigglesworth unto sd. Lovell's widow: Rigglesworth being her former husband/ and the estate of sd Rigglesworth not being divided in the sd Thomas Horne's life time.

1662 COURT: Lower Norfolk Co, VA, 15 Aug, Thomas Lovell (upon pet. of Johan Yates) hath sworn in open court that he hath delivered all ye estate belonging to orphans of Thomas Horne except one set ofcopers tools and four wedges and some stray cattle in woods not yet caught up.

John A. Brayton cp., Transcription of Lower Norfolk County, Virginia Records, Vol. 1, Wills and Deeds, Book D 1656-1666, Cain Lithographers, Jackson, MS, 2007, p. 349.

1663 COURT: Lower Norfolk Co, VA, 15 Apr, Joane Yates widow certificate granted unto her for 100 acres of land for transport Abell Fflewllen & John Sparkes.

John A. Brayton cp., Transcription of Lower Norfolk County, Virginia Records, Vol. 1, Wills and Deeds, Book D 1656-1666, Cain Lithographers, Jackson, MS, 2007, p. 370a.

1666 COURT: Lower Norfolk Co, VA, 2 May 1666, Mr. Francis Sayer requested by court to go to home of Mrs. Joan Yeates and ther to see to cattle and personal estate of Tho:/Horne late decd' divided between three sisters of the "Whold Blood."

John A. Brayton cp., Transcription of Lower Norfolk County, Virginia Records, Vol. 1, Wills and Deeds, Book D 1656-1666, Cain Lithographers, Jackson, MS, 2007, p. 438a.

1666 DEATH: Lower Norfolk Co, Will Book E f 11, dtd 22 Oct 1664, proved-----.
. . . my sonne Richard Yates and likewise my daughter Frances Vallentine . . . Executors . . .
. . . unto my sonne Richard Yates daughter Jone Yates . . .
. . . to my Daughters ffrances sone George Valentine . . .
land adjoining my grandfathers land in the merke called Baytree hole . . .
. . . to my Grandaughter Elizabeth Horne . . . to my Grandsonne Thomas Horne . . .
. . . to my Grandaughter Hanna (Joanna) Horne . . .
. . . to my Grandaughter Elizabeth Yates . . . to my Grandaughter Mary Yates . . . to my Grandsonne Richard
Yates . . . to my Grandsonne John Markeham . . . to my Grandaughter Mary ffaushaw . . . and not for her husband . . .
. . . to William Retch for . . .
. . . to my God daughter Johanna Mortene . . .
witnesses: William Retchford. Joane Yates &
Martha Hatton.
John Swaine.
John Efreag.
Wm Mortene

(McIntosh, Charles Fleming. Brief Abstract of Lower County and Norfolk County Wills 1637 - 1710: The Colonial Dames of America in the State of Virginia, 1914, p. 23.) 
Houghton, Joan (I24498)
 
172 (SOURCE: Minnis)

John Yates, 150 acres, 24 Nov 1636, p. 399. Being a neck of land upon the E.side of Eliz. Riv., the S. br. thereof, bounded S.W. to the woods. Trans. of himself, wife Joane Yates & Richard Yates. (Cavaliers & Pioneers, Patent Book 1, Part 1, p, 51)

John Yates, 100 acres. Low. New Norf. Co., 10 Mar. 1638, p. 636. On the S. br. of Eliz. Riv., up a Cr. on the E. side of the river &c. 50 acs. due for the per. adv. of his son Richard Yates & 50 acs. for trans. of 1 servt: John Merriday. Note: Renewed 20 Feb. 1643 & 150 acrs. added. Same acreage, Co., date & page. Due for his owne & the per. adv. of his wife Joane Yates. (Cavaliers & Pioneers, Patent Book 1, Part 1, p, 106)

County Court of 15 Aug 1648. Administration granted Joane Yates widow on the estate of her late husband John Yates. (Lower Norfolk County, Virginia Court Records: Book "A" 1637-1646 and Book "B" 1646-1651/52, p. 76, ref. 82a, )

Record at 6 Oct 1648, Wm: Berkeley Gov &c granting administration on the estate of John Yates, who died intestate, unto Joane Yates the widow & relict according to order of Lower Norfolk County Court dated 20 Aug 1648. Given at James Citty 31 Aug 1648. ref. 82a, (Lower Norfolk County, Virginia Court Records: Book "A" 1637-1646 and Book "B" 1646-1651/52, p. 79, ref. 87a, )

Exhibited in Court by Joane Yates. An Inventory of the goods and Chattell & Cattell of John Yates late deceased taken the 13 Nov 1648 and appraysed by Tho, Sayer, Rich: Smith, James Warner & Jofn ffinch vizt in Tobacco. Accepted in Court 15 Nov 1648 for a total sum of L tob 19,751.(Lower Norfolk County, Virginia Court Records: Book "A" 1637-1646 and Book "B" 1646-1651/52, pp. 84-85)

1653 COURT: Norfolk Co, VA, Record Book C, 15 ec, p. 64b, Nicholas Seaborne, aged abt 39, swore that Aug last it was 17 years since he left a boat at Mr. Cages house for the use of Leift. Barklett. He was then a servant to John Yates, shippwright.

John A. Brayton, cp., Transcription of Lower Norfolk County, Virginia Records, Book C, 1651-1656, 2010, p. 64b. 
Yates, John (I24497)
 
173 (SOURCE: Minnis)

Of Finchampstead, Berkshire, ENG. In 1637 George had a grant of two parts of the manor for twenty-one years from the Crown. A George Tattershall was dealing with the manor in 1659. His daughter Mary married Charles Howard, fourth son of Henry twenty-fifth Earl of Arundel, a recusant, and the manor was settled on them by George Tattershall in 1662. (A History of the County of Berkshire, Vol. 3, pp. 241-247.)

The West Court manor-house (Finchampstead) until it was enlarged and renovated by the Rev. Henry Ellis St. John in 1835 had a moat and drawbridge. The house is of red brick with tiled roofs and dates from the 17th century or perhaps earlier. The finest fireplace is perhaps that in the drawing room, formerly in the bedroom above; it has richly carved wood shafts in its jambs, and the overmantel is divided into three bays with allegorical female figures representing Wisdom, Justice, and the Arts. The middle panel is now filled with a later achievement of arms, Quarterly: 1 and 4, three fleurs de lis in a border charged with roses (Lennox), 2 and 3, a fesse checky in a border engrailed (Stewart); over all a scutcheon charged with a saltire between four roses; perhaps in memory of Lady Elizabeth Stewart, mother of Lords Charles and Bernard Howard respectively husbands of Mary and Katherine, co-heirs of George Tattershall of West Court.
'Parishes: Finchampstead', A History of the County of Berkshire: Volume 3 (1923), pp. 241-247. URL: http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=43212&strquery="perhaps in memory of Lady Elizabeth Stewart" Date accessed: 09 April 2009.

(White, Jim. Richard Wells & Frances White, Virginia & Maryland Immigrants, 1635-1637. Jim White: Lulu Press, Inc, 2009, pp. 130-131) 
Tattersall, George (I24501)
 
174 (Source: Newport Hoosier State; Thursday, August 1, 1872) Eli Newlin, residing one and a half miles southwest of this place, was suddenly attacked with cholera morbus on last Monday evening, and only lingered until the following evening when death stepped in and claimed its victim. Newlin, Eli (I16637)
 
175 (Source: Notes for Zabin Williams: By Garrett Powers); Zabin Williams, b. March, 1779, Williamstown, Berkshire, Co. Ma. d. Feb. 1830, Elizabethtown, Hardin, Co. Kentucky. m. 1st. 1799, Williamstown, MA Cintha Bukwith, b. ca. 1780, Daughter of James and Rhoda Bukwith, d. ca. 1808, believed to have deceased in Williamstown, Ma., no children recorded, 2nd.m. 1809, Smithfield, Bradford, Co. Pennsylvania, to Lucy Needham, b. ca. 1790, Bradford, Co. Pa. d. ca. 1837, Crawford, Co. Indiana, daughter of Elias Needham and Betsy (Smith) Needham, whom settled in Smithfield, Pa. prior 1790,and came from Cooperstown, New York.

Zabin was listed on the voters list for Towanda, Pa.'s first held election on 13 Oct, 1812. Zabin was also on the tax assessment list for 1812-13 in Towanda, along with his brother in-law Lemuel Landers and his son Samuel Landers. His only known children were from his 2nd marriage of which three were born in Bradford, Co., Pa. by1811. Zabin removed from Pennsylvania about 1815, with his wife and family to Elizabethtown, Hardin Co. Kentucky. Zabin remained there and possibly had additional children until his death in Feb.1830. After his death his widow and family removed to Crawford Co. Ind. to live with Constant and Addison Williams as well as their cousins the Landers.

Children known as follows:

Constant Williams, b. 26 Aug. 1810, Bradford Co. Pa. d. 5 Dec. 1874, Trilla, Coles Co. Ill. and buried in the Upper Muddy Cemetery, in Trilla, Ill, m. 28 Nov. 1831, Coles Co. Ill., to Mary Reynolds ,b. 1809, Bradford Co. Pa. Constant and Mary had six known children, all born in Coles Co. Ill.

Henry Harrison Williams b. 5 Nov. 1811, Bradford Co. Pa. d. 14 Nov. 1893, Trilla, Cumberland Co. Illinois. m. 1st.1 March 1830, Johnstown, Cumberland Co. Ill. to Lucretia Beals, b. 13 July1810, Bedford Co. Pa. d. ca. 1840 in the township of Trilla, Cumberland Co. Ill., daughter of David Beals and Philancy (Hayes) Beals whom removed from Bedford Co. Pa. to Coles Co. Ill. Henry Harrison Williams, at about age 4yrs. in 1815 removed with his father Zabin Williams and family from Towanda, Bradford, Co. They went down the Allegheny river to the Ohio river by raft to Hardin, Co. Kentucky, and then moved inland to Elizabethtown, in Kentucky. After his father Zabin Williams died ca. 1827-8, Henry at age 17yrs. removed with his widowed mother and family to Crawford, Co. Ind. By 1830 he had removed to Johnstown, Cumberland, Co. Illinois, living in the village of Trilla, where Henry and Lucretia raised at least eleven children. Henry was a Veteran of the Black Hawk War in 1832. 
Williams, Zabin (I5095)
 
176 (Source: Oren Andrew Seaton; The Seaton Families, with genealogy and biographies; 1906) Tillman, C. Ella (I3860)
 
177 (Source: Oren Andrew Seaton; The Seaton Families, with genealogy and biographies; 1906) Seaton, Nellie Alra (I16824)
 
178 (Source: Oren Andrew Seaton; The Seaton Families, with genealogy and biographies; 1906) Seaton, Ward Tillman (I16825)
 
179 (Source: REVOLUTIONARY RECORD OF AMARIAH YATES; A PIONEER AT APALACHIN, COMES TO LIGHT; From an Article in the Owego Gazette, Oct. 18, 1928; by Charles C. Cafferty; Researches made by Charles Cafferty determines that he served as a Private in the Smithfield and Cumberland Rangers - He removed with his family in 1790 from Massachusetts to Appalachian Creek - The date of his death and his burial are unknown-He leaves numerous descendants.)

The earliest record we now have of Amariah Yates (originally spelled YEATES) was taken from the town clerk's book at Mendon, Worcester Co. Mass. It stated Amariah Yeates, of Smithfield RI married Margaret Thayer, of Mendon, April 1, 1773. Prior to Amariah's residence at Smithfield RI, he lived at Uxbridge Mass. Margaret Thayer, wife of Amariah, had a sister, Mercy, who married Barzette Yeates. Barzette may have been a brother of Amariah. Nothing is now known of Amariah's earlier family history or descent.

Margaret Thayer was the daughter of Thomas Thayer, born 1722, who married Susanna Blake. Thomas was the fourth son of Hon. Thomas who married Ruth Darling in 1715. Hon Thomas was the second oldest of ten children of Capt. Thomas Thayer and Mary Adams, who married in 1688. Capt. Thomas was the sixth son of Ferdinando Thayer, who married Huldah Howard, of Braintree, Mass in 1652. Ferdinando was the second son of Thomas Thayer who Marjorie (?) in England, and who died at Mendon Mass. in 1715. Thomas and his brother, Richard came from Braintree, England to John Winthrop's Massachusetts Colony prior to 1636 for at that date they were land owners at Braintree Mass.

Military papers, RI Historical Society, Mss. 239, state that Amariah Yeates served as a Private with the Smithfield and Cumberland Rangers in May 1776; A Military census taken in 1777 listing men between the ages of 16 and 50 "able to bear arms" includes the name of Amariah Yeates, a resident of Smithfield; Hospital papers, RI Historical Society, state that Amariah served as a Private in Col. George Peck's Independent Company of the Smithfield and Cumberland Rangers, under Capt. William Bowen. His name appears on a return of arms, etc. dated Smithfield, Oct. 18, 1779; these service records were furnished by the RI state record commissioner at Providence. They are official and will be accepted by the patriotic societies in case any descendent desires to make application for membership. There are no service records in the files in Washington.

A local history states that Amariah Yates located near the mouth of the Appalachian Creek. In 1791 when the districts were assigned for the first river road, Amariah Yates (there spelled incorrectly, spelled Ates) was listed in district number 3 the west end of which was somewhat above the Appalachian Creek. Therefore soldier Yates and his family removed from Massachusetts to the flats of the Appalachian Creek between 1790 and 1791. Jan 13, 1799, Amariah purchased from his Son-in-law, Jehu Barney, for $500, a part of lot 84 in the McMaster Half Township. This deed was witnessed by Lemuel Yates, Pardon Yates and Ellick Yeates (probably Alexander). This land included farms later owned by Tilbury and Decker and bordered Barnes Creek a mile east of Owego (NY).

Kingman County History names our pioneers in 1802. The names are in two lists. One list includes persons on and the other, persons not on Coxe's Patent. Amariah's name is here included on the latter list. This would indicate that he had removed from his first home along Appalachian Creek, which is within the Coxe grant. Amariah may have lived on the Barnes Creek land for a time. Family tradition indicates that died near his first home by the Appalachian Creek.

Lemuel, son of Amariah, married Lucinda, daughter of Francis Norwood. In 1801 Lemuel and Francis removed from Appalachian to the town of Caroline near the village of Slaterville. Lemuel purchased his 107 acre farm there in 1814. In 1810, Lemuel was a Captain of Militia at General Training in Owego. He had children. 1. Stephen 2. Amariah 3. Benjamin 4. Francis 5. William 6. Joseph 7. Lydia 8. Miranda 9. Canvice 10 Mary

Pardon, son of Amariah, married Lydia, daughter of Thomas TRACY, and aunt of COL. BENJ. TRACY. Pardon married second Elizabeth, twin of Catherine and daughter of Maria Johnson and Francis Earsley, a Revolutionary Soldier, who died at Roxbury NJ in 1790. Widow Maria Johnson Earsley and her family were the first permanent settlers in the town of Caroline in 1794. In 1812, Pardon was Ensign at General Training in Owego. In 1821 he lived on the newly surveyed lot 90 of Coxe's Patent. He then had a log house and barn and 60 of his 117 acres improved. The log house was located on the little creek next above Appalachian Creek. Thereby the state road and railroad still stand some struggling apple trees to mark the site. Pardon died here in August, 1833. He was buried in the old part of the Appalachian Cemetery. There was no headstone. Widow Elizabeth who settled Pardon's estate June 10, 1834, lived in the log house for a time. She finally disposed of her squatter rights here and purchased a farm on the hill, up the first road above the Appalachian Creek. She divided this property between her two sons, Tracy and Johnson, with the provision that she should be maintained. Tracy sold his part to Ira Edwards, the husband of Elizabeth, her daughter. Mother Elizabeth spent her remaining days with Elizabeth and Ira and buried in the Edwards Lot in the Appalachian Cemetery. There was no Headstone. She was born Nov. 2, 1789 and died July 20, 1888.

Gilbert, son of Amariah, married Polly Frear. In 1821 Gilbert was a squatter above his brother, Pardon, on lot 93 and on one-half of lot 94, the other half of which was taken by David Brown. The surveyor's field book credits Gilbert with a log house and barn and 25 acres improved. The log house stood near the present Glann district school house. He never purchased this land, but sold his squatter rights probably to Josiah Davison, who built a frame house where George Glann now lives. Gilbert removed to a house in Appalachia, razed in 1927 by George Tracy. The house stood on the east side of the Appalachian Creek Road, just beyond the road forking westward and winding back to the village. It was one of the oldest houses in town. Alanson Goodenow, aged 86 years, said he was born there. It was later owned by Peter Yaple, who sold it to Stephen Holmes. A story is still told of a bear carrying away the Yates stock.

Cyrene, daughter of Amariah, married David Smith, of Appalachian.

Laben J. Yates married Mary, the widow of Dr. Wright.

Benjamin Yates married Lucy Goodenow, the sister Chauncey Goodenow.

Paul, son of Amariah, b. 1781 d 1834, married Elizabeth b. 1791 d. 1842, who was possibly a Bates. Paul and also his family died comparatively young leaving meager records. He resided in the west side of Barnes Creek on a part of the lot 84 formerly owned by his father, Amariah. Six weeks before Paul died he purchased his brother, Lemuel's, "undivided ninth part of lot 84, being the share of Lemuel in the real estate left by his father, Amariah Yates."

Alexander, son of Amariah, b. March 21, 1784, at Mendon Mass. d. June 20, 1866, married Sept 1807, Polly Camp, daughter of Col Asa Camp, Revolutionary Soldier. Polly b. Nov 23, 1791 d. Aug. 2, 1867. Their Photographs are still preserved. Alexander resided on the east side of Barnes Creek adjoining his brother, Paul, on a part of lot 84 formerly owned by his father Amariah. In 1830, he purchased his brother Pardon's "undivided ninth part of this lot 84. in his possession now being." Alexander and Paul are buried in the nearby LaMont Cemetery.

Ruth and Hope were daughters of Amariah, but there are no records of these two daughters.

Tabarah (or Tabatha) daughter of Amariah, married Jehu Barney, son of Major David Barney, Revolutionary soldier.

Thus is accounted for the nine children of Amariah Yates, conforming to the phrase in the two deeds mentioned above "one undivided ninth part of"

(By Charles Cafferty, Appalachian; Sept 24, 1928; re-edited by Ron Yates 8/1/2010) 
Yates, Cyrene (I11500)
 
180 (Source: REVOLUTIONARY RECORD OF AMARIAH YATES; A PIONEER AT APALACHIN, COMES TO LIGHT; From an Article in the Owego Gazette, Oct. 18, 1928; by Charles C. Cafferty; Researches made by Charles Cafferty determines that he served as a Private in the Smithfield and Cumberland Rangers - He removed with his family in 1790 from Massachusetts to Appalachian Creek - The date of his death and his burial are unknown-He leaves numerous descendants.)

The earliest record we now have of Amariah Yates (originally spelled YEATES) was taken from the town clerk's book at Mendon, Worcester Co. Mass. It stated Amariah Yeates, of Smithfield RI married Margaret Thayer, of Mendon, April 1, 1773. Prior to Amariah's residence at Smithfield RI, he lived at Uxbridge Mass. Margaret Thayer, wife of Amariah, had a sister, Mercy, who married Barzette Yeates. Barzette may have been a brother of Amariah. Nothing is now known of Amariah's earlier family history or descent.

Margaret Thayer was the daughter of Thomas Thayer, born 1722, who married Susanna Blake. Thomas was the fourth son of Hon. Thomas who married Ruth Darling in 1715. Hon Thomas was the second oldest of ten children of Capt. Thomas Thayer and Mary Adams, who married in 1688. Capt. Thomas was the sixth son of Ferdinando Thayer, who married Huldah Howard, of Braintree, Mass in 1652. Ferdinando was the second son of Thomas Thayer who Marjorie (?) in England, and who died at Mendon Mass. in 1715. Thomas and his brother, Richard came from Braintree, England to John Winthrop's Massachusetts Colony prior to 1636 for at that date they were land owners at Braintree Mass.

Military papers, RI Historical Society, Mss. 239, state that Amariah Yeates served as a Private with the Smithfield and Cumberland Rangers in May 1776; A Military census taken in 1777 listing men between the ages of 16 and 50 "able to bear arms" includes the name of Amariah Yeates, a resident of Smithfield; Hospital papers, RI Historical Society, state that Amariah served as a Private in Col. George Peck's Independent Company of the Smithfield and Cumberland Rangers, under Capt. William Bowen. His name appears on a return of arms, etc. dated Smithfield, Oct. 18, 1779; these service records were furnished by the RI state record commissioner at Providence. They are official and will be accepted by the patriotic societies in case any descendent desires to make application for membership. There are no service records in the files in Washington.

A local history states that Amariah Yates located near the mouth of the Appalachian Creek. In 1791 when the districts were assigned for the first river road, Amariah Yates (there spelled incorrectly, spelled Ates) was listed in district number 3 the west end of which was somewhat above the Appalachian Creek. Therefore soldier Yates and his family removed from Massachusetts to the flats of the Appalachian Creek between 1790 and 1791. Jan 13, 1799, Amariah purchased from his Son-in-law, Jehu Barney, for $500, a part of lot 84 in the McMaster Half Township. This deed was witnessed by Lemuel Yates, Pardon Yates and Ellick Yeates (probably Alexander). This land included farms later owned by Tilbury and Decker and bordered Barnes Creek a mile east of Owego (NY).

Kingman County History names our pioneers in 1802. The names are in two lists. One list includes persons on and the other, persons not on Coxe's Patent. Amariah's name is here included on the latter list. This would indicate that he had removed from his first home along Appalachian Creek, which is within the Coxe grant. Amariah may have lived on the Barnes Creek land for a time. Family tradition indicates that died near his first home by the Appalachian Creek.

Lemuel, son of Amariah, married Lucinda, daughter of Francis Norwood. In 1801 Lemuel and Francis removed from Appalachian to the town of Caroline near the village of Slaterville. Lemuel purchased his 107 acre farm there in 1814. In 1810, Lemuel was a Captain of Militia at General Training in Owego. He had children. 1. Stephen 2. Amariah 3. Benjamin 4. Francis 5. William 6. Joseph 7. Lydia 8. Miranda 9. Canvice 10 Mary

Pardon, son of Amariah, married Lydia, daughter of Thomas TRACY, and aunt of COL. BENJ. TRACY. Pardon married second Elizabeth, twin of Catherine and daughter of Maria Johnson and Francis Earsley, a Revolutionary Soldier, who died at Roxbury NJ in 1790. Widow Maria Johnson Earsley and her family were the first permanent settlers in the town of Caroline in 1794. In 1812, Pardon was Ensign at General Training in Owego. In 1821 he lived on the newly surveyed lot 90 of Coxe's Patent. He then had a log house and barn and 60 of his 117 acres improved. The log house was located on the little creek next above Appalachian Creek. Thereby the state road and railroad still stand some struggling apple trees to mark the site. Pardon died here in August, 1833. He was buried in the old part of the Appalachian Cemetery. There was no headstone. Widow Elizabeth who settled Pardon's estate June 10, 1834, lived in the log house for a time. She finally disposed of her squatter rights here and purchased a farm on the hill, up the first road above the Appalachian Creek. She divided this property between her two sons, Tracy and Johnson, with the provision that she should be maintained. Tracy sold his part to Ira Edwards, the husband of Elizabeth, her daughter. Mother Elizabeth spent her remaining days with Elizabeth and Ira and buried in the Edwards Lot in the Appalachian Cemetery. There was no Headstone. She was born Nov. 2, 1789 and died July 20, 1888.

Gilbert, son of Amariah, married Polly Frear. In 1821 Gilbert was a squatter above his brother, Pardon, on lot 93 and on one-half of lot 94, the other half of which was taken by David Brown. The surveyor's field book credits Gilbert with a log house and barn and 25 acres improved. The log house stood near the present Glann district school house. He never purchased this land, but sold his squatter rights probably to Josiah Davison, who built a frame house where George Glann now lives. Gilbert removed to a house in Appalachia, razed in 1927 by George Tracy. The house stood on the east side of the Appalachian Creek Road, just beyond the road forking westward and winding back to the village. It was one of the oldest houses in town. Alanson Goodenow, aged 86 years, said he was born there. It was later owned by Peter Yaple, who sold it to Stephen Holmes. A story is still told of a bear carrying away the Yates stock.

Cyrene, daughter of Amariah, married David Smith, of Appalachian.

Laben J. Yates married Mary, the widow of Dr. Wright.

Benjamin Yates married Lucy Goodenow, the sister Chauncey Goodenow.

Paul, son of Amariah, b. 1781 d 1834, married Elizabeth b. 1791 d. 1842, who was possibly a Bates. Paul and also his family died comparatively young leaving meager records. He resided in the west side of Barnes Creek on a part of the lot 84 formerly owned by his father, Amariah. Six weeks before Paul died he purchased his brother, Lemuel's, "undivided ninth part of lot 84, being the share of Lemuel in the real estate left by his father, Amariah Yates."

Alexander, son of Amariah, b. March 21, 1784, at Mendon Mass. d. June 20, 1866, married Sept 1807, Polly Camp, daughter of Col Asa Camp, Revolutionary Soldier. Polly b. Nov 23, 1791 d. Aug. 2, 1867. Their Photographs are still preserved. Alexander resided on the east side of Barnes Creek adjoining his brother, Paul, on a part of lot 84 formerly owned by his father Amariah. In 1830, he purchased his brother Pardon's "undivided ninth part of this lot 84. in his possession now being." Alexander and Paul are buried in the nearby LaMont Cemetery.

Ruth and Hope were daughters of Amariah, but there are no records of these two daughters.

Tabarah (or Tabatha) daughter of Amariah, married Jehu Barney, son of Major David Barney, Revolutionary soldier.

Thus is accounted for the nine children of Amariah Yates, conforming to the phrase in the two deeds mentioned above "one undivided ninth part of"

(By Charles Cafferty, Appalachian; Sept 24, 1928; re-edited by Ron Yates 8/1/2010)

Pardon Yates Birth: 1774, USA Death: 1833 Apalachin Tioga County New York, USA Born in Smithfield, Providence, Rhode Island, USA on 1774 to Amariah Yates and Margaret Thayer. Pardon married Lydia Tracy and had 2 children. Pardon married Elizabeth Earsley and had 8 children. He passed away on 1833 in Apalachin, New York, USA. Family links: Parents: Amariah Yates (1748 - 1813) Children: Betsey Yates Edwards (1828 - 1886)* *Calculated relationship Burial: Riverside Cemetery Apalachin Tioga County New York, USA Created by: CarolBee Record added: Sep 22, 2012 Find A Grave Memorial# 97612214 
Yates, Pardon (I14364)
 
181 (Source: REVOLUTIONARY RECORD OF AMARIAH YATES; A PIONEER AT APALACHIN, COMES TO LIGHT; From an Article in the Owego Gazette, Oct. 18, 1928; by Charles C. Cafferty; Researches made by Charles Cafferty determines that he served as a Private in the Smithfield and Cumberland Rangers - He removed with his family in 1790 from Massachusetts to Appalachian Creek - The date of his death and his burial are unknown-He leaves numerous descendants.)

The earliest record we now have of Amariah Yates (originally spelled YEATES) was taken from the town clerk's book at Mendon, Worcester Co. Mass. It stated Amariah Yeates, of Smithfield RI married Margaret Thayer, of Mendon, April 1, 1773. Prior to Amariah's residence at Smithfield RI, he lived at Uxbridge Mass. Margaret Thayer, wife of Amariah, had a sister, Mercy, who married Barzette Yeates. Barzette may have been a brother of Amariah. Nothing is now known of Amariah's earlier family history or descent.

Margaret Thayer was the daughter of Thomas Thayer, born 1722, who married Susanna Blake. Thomas was the fourth son of Hon. Thomas who married Ruth Darling in 1715. Hon Thomas was the second oldest of ten children of Capt. Thomas Thayer and Mary Adams, who married in 1688. Capt. Thomas was the sixth son of Ferdinando Thayer, who married Huldah Howard, of Braintree, Mass in 1652. Ferdinando was the second son of Thomas Thayer who Marjorie (?) in England, and who died at Mendon Mass. in 1715. Thomas and his brother, Richard came from Braintree, England to John Winthrop's Massachusetts Colony prior to 1636 for at that date they were land owners at Braintree Mass.

Military papers, RI Historical Society, Mss. 239, state that Amariah Yeates served as a Private with the Smithfield and Cumberland Rangers in May 1776; A Military census taken in 1777 listing men between the ages of 16 and 50 "able to bear arms" includes the name of Amariah Yeates, a resident of Smithfield; Hospital papers, RI Historical Society, state that Amariah served as a Private in Col. George Peck's Independent Company of the Smithfield and Cumberland Rangers, under Capt. William Bowen. His name appears on a return of arms, etc. dated Smithfield, Oct. 18, 1779; these service records were furnished by the RI state record commissioner at Providence. They are official and will be accepted by the patriotic societies in case any descendent desires to make application for membership. There are no service records in the files in Washington.

A local history states that Amariah Yates located near the mouth of the Appalachian Creek. In 1791 when the districts were assigned for the first river road, Amariah Yates (there spelled incorrectly, spelled Ates) was listed in district number 3 the west end of which was somewhat above the Appalachian Creek. Therefore soldier Yates and his family removed from Massachusetts to the flats of the Appalachian Creek between 1790 and 1791. Jan 13, 1799, Amariah purchased from his Son-in-law, Jehu Barney, for $500, a part of lot 84 in the McMaster Half Township. This deed was witnessed by Lemuel Yates, Pardon Yates and Ellick Yeates (probably Alexander). This land included farms later owned by Tilbury and Decker and bordered Barnes Creek a mile east of Owego (NY).

Kingman County History names our pioneers in 1802. The names are in two lists. One list includes persons on and the other, persons not on Coxe's Patent. Amariah's name is here included on the latter list. This would indicate that he had removed from his first home along Appalachian Creek, which is within the Coxe grant. Amariah may have lived on the Barnes Creek land for a time. Family tradition indicates that died near his first home by the Appalachian Creek.

Lemuel, son of Amariah, married Lucinda, daughter of Francis Norwood. In 1801 Lemuel and Francis removed from Appalachian to the town of Caroline near the village of Slaterville. Lemuel purchased his 107 acre farm there in 1814. In 1810, Lemuel was a Captain of Militia at General Training in Owego. He had children. 1. Stephen 2. Amariah 3. Benjamin 4. Francis 5. William 6. Joseph 7. Lydia 8. Miranda 9. Canvice 10 Mary

Pardon, son of Amariah, married Lydia, daughter of Thomas TRACY, and aunt of COL. BENJ. TRACY. Pardon married second Elizabeth, twin of Catherine and daughter of Maria Johnson and Francis Earsley, a Revolutionary Soldier, who died at Roxbury NJ in 1790. Widow Maria Johnson Earsley and her family were the first permanent settlers in the town of Caroline in 1794. In 1812, Pardon was Ensign at General Training in Owego. In 1821 he lived on the newly surveyed lot 90 of Coxe's Patent. He then had a log house and barn and 60 of his 117 acres improved. The log house was located on the little creek next above Appalachian Creek. Thereby the state road and railroad still stand some struggling apple trees to mark the site. Pardon died here in August, 1833. He was buried in the old part of the Appalachian Cemetery. There was no headstone. Widow Elizabeth who settled Pardon's estate June 10, 1834, lived in the log house for a time. She finally disposed of her squatter rights here and purchased a farm on the hill, up the first road above the Appalachian Creek. She divided this property between her two sons, Tracy and Johnson, with the provision that she should be maintained. Tracy sold his part to Ira Edwards, the husband of Elizabeth, her daughter. Mother Elizabeth spent her remaining days with Elizabeth and Ira and buried in the Edwards Lot in the Appalachian Cemetery. There was no Headstone. She was born Nov. 2, 1789 and died July 20, 1888.

Gilbert, son of Amariah, married Polly Frear. In 1821 Gilbert was a squatter above his brother, Pardon, on lot 93 and on one-half of lot 94, the other half of which was taken by David Brown. The surveyor's field book credits Gilbert with a log house and barn and 25 acres improved. The log house stood near the present Glann district school house. He never purchased this land, but sold his squatter rights probably to Josiah Davison, who built a frame house where George Glann now lives. Gilbert removed to a house in Appalachia, razed in 1927 by George Tracy. The house stood on the east side of the Appalachian Creek Road, just beyond the road forking westward and winding back to the village. It was one of the oldest houses in town. Alanson Goodenow, aged 86 years, said he was born there. It was later owned by Peter Yaple, who sold it to Stephen Holmes. A story is still told of a bear carrying away the Yates stock.

Cyrene, daughter of Amariah, married David Smith, of Appalachian.

Laben J. Yates married Mary, the widow of Dr. Wright.

Benjamin Yates married Lucy Goodenow, the sister Chauncey Goodenow.

Paul, son of Amariah, b. 1781 d 1834, married Elizabeth b. 1791 d. 1842, who was possibly a Bates. Paul and also his family died comparatively young leaving meager records. He resided in the west side of Barnes Creek on a part of the lot 84 formerly owned by his father, Amariah. Six weeks before Paul died he purchased his brother, Lemuel's, "undivided ninth part of lot 84, being the share of Lemuel in the real estate left by his father, Amariah Yates."

Alexander, son of Amariah, b. March 21, 1784, at Mendon Mass. d. June 20, 1866, married Sept 1807, Polly Camp, daughter of Col Asa Camp, Revolutionary Soldier. Polly b. Nov 23, 1791 d. Aug. 2, 1867. Their Photographs are still preserved. Alexander resided on the east side of Barnes Creek adjoining his brother, Paul, on a part of lot 84 formerly owned by his father Amariah. In 1830, he purchased his brother Pardon's "undivided ninth part of this lot 84. in his possession now being." Alexander and Paul are buried in the nearby LaMont Cemetery.

Ruth and Hope were daughters of Amariah, but there are no records of these two daughters.

Tabarah (or Tabatha) daughter of Amariah, married Jehu Barney, son of Major David Barney, Revolutionary soldier.

Thus is accounted for the nine children of Amariah Yates, conforming to the phrase in the two deeds mentioned above "one undivided ninth part of"

(By Charles Cafferty, Appalachian; Sept 24, 1928; re-edited by Ron Yates 8/1/2010) 
Yates, Gilbert (I14365)
 
182 (Source: REVOLUTIONARY RECORD OF AMARIAH YATES; A PIONEER AT APALACHIN, COMES TO LIGHT; From an Article in the Owego Gazette, Oct. 18, 1928; by Charles C. Cafferty; Researches made by Charles Cafferty determines that he served as a Private in the Smithfield and Cumberland Rangers - He removed with his family in 1790 from Massachusetts to Appalachian Creek - The date of his death and his burial are unknown-He leaves numerous descendants.)

The earliest record we now have of Amariah Yates (originally spelled YEATES) was taken from the town clerk's book at Mendon, Worcester Co. Mass. It stated Amariah Yeates, of Smithfield RI married Margaret Thayer, of Mendon, April 1, 1773. Prior to Amariah's residence at Smithfield RI, he lived at Uxbridge Mass. Margaret Thayer, wife of Amariah, had a sister, Mercy, who married Barzette Yeates. Barzette may have been a brother of Amariah. Nothing is now known of Amariah's earlier family history or descent.

Margaret Thayer was the daughter of Thomas Thayer, born 1722, who married Susanna Blake. Thomas was the fourth son of Hon. Thomas who married Ruth Darling in 1715. Hon Thomas was the second oldest of ten children of Capt. Thomas Thayer and Mary Adams, who married in 1688. Capt. Thomas was the sixth son of Ferdinando Thayer, who married Huldah Howard, of Braintree, Mass in 1652. Ferdinando was the second son of Thomas Thayer who Marjorie (?) in England, and who died at Mendon Mass. in 1715. Thomas and his brother, Richard came from Braintree, England to John Winthrop's Massachusetts Colony prior to 1636 for at that date they were land owners at Braintree Mass.

Military papers, RI Historical Society, Mss. 239, state that Amariah Yeates served as a Private with the Smithfield and Cumberland Rangers in May 1776; A Military census taken in 1777 listing men between the ages of 16 and 50 "able to bear arms" includes the name of Amariah Yeates, a resident of Smithfield; Hospital papers, RI Historical Society, state that Amariah served as a Private in Col. George Peck's Independent Company of the Smithfield and Cumberland Rangers, under Capt. William Bowen. His name appears on a return of arms, etc. dated Smithfield, Oct. 18, 1779; these service records were furnished by the RI state record commissioner at Providence. They are official and will be accepted by the patriotic societies in case any descendent desires to make application for membership. There are no service records in the files in Washington.

A local history states that Amariah Yates located near the mouth of the Appalachian Creek. In 1791 when the districts were assigned for the first river road, Amariah Yates (there spelled incorrectly, spelled Ates) was listed in district number 3 the west end of which was somewhat above the Appalachian Creek. Therefore soldier Yates and his family removed from Massachusetts to the flats of the Appalachian Creek between 1790 and 1791. Jan 13, 1799, Amariah purchased from his Son-in-law, Jehu Barney, for $500, a part of lot 84 in the McMaster Half Township. This deed was witnessed by Lemuel Yates, Pardon Yates and Ellick Yeates (probably Alexander). This land included farms later owned by Tilbury and Decker and bordered Barnes Creek a mile east of Owego (NY).

Kingman County History names our pioneers in 1802. The names are in two lists. One list includes persons on and the other, persons not on Coxe's Patent. Amariah's name is here included on the latter list. This would indicate that he had removed from his first home along Appalachian Creek, which is within the Coxe grant. Amariah may have lived on the Barnes Creek land for a time. Family tradition indicates that died near his first home by the Appalachian Creek.

Lemuel, son of Amariah, married Lucinda, daughter of Francis Norwood. In 1801 Lemuel and Francis removed from Appalachian to the town of Caroline near the village of Slaterville. Lemuel purchased his 107 acre farm there in 1814. In 1810, Lemuel was a Captain of Militia at General Training in Owego. He had children. 1. Stephen 2. Amariah 3. Benjamin 4. Francis 5. William 6. Joseph 7. Lydia 8. Miranda 9. Canvice 10 Mary

Pardon, son of Amariah, married Lydia, daughter of Thomas TRACY, and aunt of COL. BENJ. TRACY. Pardon married second Elizabeth, twin of Catherine and daughter of Maria Johnson and Francis Earsley, a Revolutionary Soldier, who died at Roxbury NJ in 1790. Widow Maria Johnson Earsley and her family were the first permanent settlers in the town of Caroline in 1794. In 1812, Pardon was Ensign at General Training in Owego. In 1821 he lived on the newly surveyed lot 90 of Coxe's Patent. He then had a log house and barn and 60 of his 117 acres improved. The log house was located on the little creek next above Appalachian Creek. Thereby the state road and railroad still stand some struggling apple trees to mark the site. Pardon died here in August, 1833. He was buried in the old part of the Appalachian Cemetery. There was no headstone. Widow Elizabeth who settled Pardon's estate June 10, 1834, lived in the log house for a time. She finally disposed of her squatter rights here and purchased a farm on the hill, up the first road above the Appalachian Creek. She divided this property between her two sons, Tracy and Johnson, with the provision that she should be maintained. Tracy sold his part to Ira Edwards, the husband of Elizabeth, her daughter. Mother Elizabeth spent her remaining days with Elizabeth and Ira and buried in the Edwards Lot in the Appalachian Cemetery. There was no Headstone. She was born Nov. 2, 1789 and died July 20, 1888.

Gilbert, son of Amariah, married Polly Frear. In 1821 Gilbert was a squatter above his brother, Pardon, on lot 93 and on one-half of lot 94, the other half of which was taken by David Brown. The surveyor's field book credits Gilbert with a log house and barn and 25 acres improved. The log house stood near the present Glann district school house. He never purchased this land, but sold his squatter rights probably to Josiah Davison, who built a frame house where George Glann now lives. Gilbert removed to a house in Appalachia, razed in 1927 by George Tracy. The house stood on the east side of the Appalachian Creek Road, just beyond the road forking westward and winding back to the village. It was one of the oldest houses in town. Alanson Goodenow, aged 86 years, said he was born there. It was later owned by Peter Yaple, who sold it to Stephen Holmes. A story is still told of a bear carrying away the Yates stock.

Cyrene, daughter of Amariah, married David Smith, of Appalachian.

Laben J. Yates married Mary, the widow of Dr. Wright.

Benjamin Yates married Lucy Goodenow, the sister Chauncey Goodenow.

Paul, son of Amariah, b. 1781 d 1834, married Elizabeth b. 1791 d. 1842, who was possibly a Bates. Paul and also his family died comparatively young leaving meager records. He resided in the west side of Barnes Creek on a part of the lot 84 formerly owned by his father, Amariah. Six weeks before Paul died he purchased his brother, Lemuel's, "undivided ninth part of lot 84, being the share of Lemuel in the real estate left by his father, Amariah Yates."

Alexander, son of Amariah, b. March 21, 1784, at Mendon Mass. d. June 20, 1866, married Sept 1807, Polly Camp, daughter of Col Asa Camp, Revolutionary Soldier. Polly b. Nov 23, 1791 d. Aug. 2, 1867. Their Photographs are still preserved. Alexander resided on the east side of Barnes Creek adjoining his brother, Paul, on a part of lot 84 formerly owned by his father Amariah. In 1830, he purchased his brother Pardon's "undivided ninth part of this lot 84. in his possession now being." Alexander and Paul are buried in the nearby LaMont Cemetery.

Ruth and Hope were daughters of Amariah, but there are no records of these two daughters.

Tabarah (or Tabatha) daughter of Amariah, married Jehu Barney, son of Major David Barney, Revolutionary soldier.

Thus is accounted for the nine children of Amariah Yates, conforming to the phrase in the two deeds mentioned above "one undivided ninth part of"

(By Charles Cafferty, Appalachian; Sept 24, 1928; re-edited by Ron Yates 8/1/2010) 
Yates, Laben J. (I14366)
 
183 (Source: REVOLUTIONARY RECORD OF AMARIAH YATES; A PIONEER AT APALACHIN, COMES TO LIGHT; From an Article in the Owego Gazette, Oct. 18, 1928; by Charles C. Cafferty; Researches made by Charles Cafferty determines that he served as a Private in the Smithfield and Cumberland Rangers - He removed with his family in 1790 from Massachusetts to Appalachian Creek - The date of his death and his burial are unknown-He leaves numerous descendants.)

The earliest record we now have of Amariah Yates (originally spelled YEATES) was taken from the town clerk's book at Mendon, Worcester Co. Mass. It stated Amariah Yeates, of Smithfield RI married Margaret Thayer, of Mendon, April 1, 1773. Prior to Amariah's residence at Smithfield RI, he lived at Uxbridge Mass. Margaret Thayer, wife of Amariah, had a sister, Mercy, who married Barzette Yeates. Barzette may have been a brother of Amariah. Nothing is now known of Amariah's earlier family history or descent.

Margaret Thayer was the daughter of Thomas Thayer, born 1722, who married Susanna Blake. Thomas was the fourth son of Hon. Thomas who married Ruth Darling in 1715. Hon Thomas was the second oldest of ten children of Capt. Thomas Thayer and Mary Adams, who married in 1688. Capt. Thomas was the sixth son of Ferdinando Thayer, who married Huldah Howard, of Braintree, Mass in 1652. Ferdinando was the second son of Thomas Thayer who Marjorie (?) in England, and who died at Mendon Mass. in 1715. Thomas and his brother, Richard came from Braintree, England to John Winthrop's Massachusetts Colony prior to 1636 for at that date they were land owners at Braintree Mass.

Military papers, RI Historical Society, Mss. 239, state that Amariah Yeates served as a Private with the Smithfield and Cumberland Rangers in May 1776; A Military census taken in 1777 listing men between the ages of 16 and 50 "able to bear arms" includes the name of Amariah Yeates, a resident of Smithfield; Hospital papers, RI Historical Society, state that Amariah served as a Private in Col. George Peck's Independent Company of the Smithfield and Cumberland Rangers, under Capt. William Bowen. His name appears on a return of arms, etc. dated Smithfield, Oct. 18, 1779; these service records were furnished by the RI state record commissioner at Providence. They are official and will be accepted by the patriotic societies in case any descendent desires to make application for membership. There are no service records in the files in Washington.

A local history states that Amariah Yates located near the mouth of the Appalachian Creek. In 1791 when the districts were assigned for the first river road, Amariah Yates (there spelled incorrectly, spelled Ates) was listed in district number 3 the west end of which was somewhat above the Appalachian Creek. Therefore soldier Yates and his family removed from Massachusetts to the flats of the Appalachian Creek between 1790 and 1791. Jan 13, 1799, Amariah purchased from his Son-in-law, Jehu Barney, for $500, a part of lot 84 in the McMaster Half Township. This deed was witnessed by Lemuel Yates, Pardon Yates and Ellick Yeates (probably Alexander). This land included farms later owned by Tilbury and Decker and bordered Barnes Creek a mile east of Owego (NY).

Kingman County History names our pioneers in 1802. The names are in two lists. One list includes persons on and the other, persons not on Coxe's Patent. Amariah's name is here included on the latter list. This would indicate that he had removed from his first home along Appalachian Creek, which is within the Coxe grant. Amariah may have lived on the Barnes Creek land for a time. Family tradition indicates that died near his first home by the Appalachian Creek.

Lemuel, son of Amariah, married Lucinda, daughter of Francis Norwood. In 1801 Lemuel and Francis removed from Appalachian to the town of Caroline near the village of Slaterville. Lemuel purchased his 107 acre farm there in 1814. In 1810, Lemuel was a Captain of Militia at General Training in Owego. He had children. 1. Stephen 2. Amariah 3. Benjamin 4. Francis 5. William 6. Joseph 7. Lydia 8. Miranda 9. Canvice 10 Mary

Pardon, son of Amariah, married Lydia, daughter of Thomas TRACY, and aunt of COL. BENJ. TRACY. Pardon married second Elizabeth, twin of Catherine and daughter of Maria Johnson and Francis Earsley, a Revolutionary Soldier, who died at Roxbury NJ in 1790. Widow Maria Johnson Earsley and her family were the first permanent settlers in the town of Caroline in 1794. In 1812, Pardon was Ensign at General Training in Owego. In 1821 he lived on the newly surveyed lot 90 of Coxe's Patent. He then had a log house and barn and 60 of his 117 acres improved. The log house was located on the little creek next above Appalachian Creek. Thereby the state road and railroad still stand some struggling apple trees to mark the site. Pardon died here in August, 1833. He was buried in the old part of the Appalachian Cemetery. There was no headstone. Widow Elizabeth who settled Pardon's estate June 10, 1834, lived in the log house for a time. She finally disposed of her squatter rights here and purchased a farm on the hill, up the first road above the Appalachian Creek. She divided this property between her two sons, Tracy and Johnson, with the provision that she should be maintained. Tracy sold his part to Ira Edwards, the husband of Elizabeth, her daughter. Mother Elizabeth spent her remaining days with Elizabeth and Ira and buried in the Edwards Lot in the Appalachian Cemetery. There was no Headstone. She was born Nov. 2, 1789 and died July 20, 1888.

Gilbert, son of Amariah, married Polly Frear. In 1821 Gilbert was a squatter above his brother, Pardon, on lot 93 and on one-half of lot 94, the other half of which was taken by David Brown. The surveyor's field book credits Gilbert with a log house and barn and 25 acres improved. The log house stood near the present Glann district school house. He never purchased this land, but sold his squatter rights probably to Josiah Davison, who built a frame house where George Glann now lives. Gilbert removed to a house in Appalachia, razed in 1927 by George Tracy. The house stood on the east side of the Appalachian Creek Road, just beyond the road forking westward and winding back to the village. It was one of the oldest houses in town. Alanson Goodenow, aged 86 years, said he was born there. It was later owned by Peter Yaple, who sold it to Stephen Holmes. A story is still told of a bear carrying away the Yates stock.

Cyrene, daughter of Amariah, married David Smith, of Appalachian.

Laben J. Yates married Mary, the widow of Dr. Wright.

Benjamin Yates married Lucy Goodenow, the sister Chauncey Goodenow.

Paul, son of Amariah, b. 1781 d 1834, married Elizabeth b. 1791 d. 1842, who was possibly a Bates. Paul and also his family died comparatively young leaving meager records. He resided in the west side of Barnes Creek on a part of the lot 84 formerly owned by his father, Amariah. Six weeks before Paul died he purchased his brother, Lemuel's, "undivided ninth part of lot 84, being the share of Lemuel in the real estate left by his father, Amariah Yates."

Alexander, son of Amariah, b. March 21, 1784, at Mendon Mass. d. June 20, 1866, married Sept 1807, Polly Camp, daughter of Col Asa Camp, Revolutionary Soldier. Polly b. Nov 23, 1791 d. Aug. 2, 1867. Their Photographs are still preserved. Alexander resided on the east side of Barnes Creek adjoining his brother, Paul, on a part of lot 84 formerly owned by his father Amariah. In 1830, he purchased his brother Pardon's "undivided ninth part of this lot 84. in his possession now being." Alexander and Paul are buried in the nearby LaMont Cemetery.

Ruth and Hope were daughters of Amariah, but there are no records of these two daughters.

Tabarah (or Tabatha) daughter of Amariah, married Jehu Barney, son of Major David Barney, Revolutionary soldier.

Thus is accounted for the nine children of Amariah Yates, conforming to the phrase in the two deeds mentioned above "one undivided ninth part of"

(By Charles Cafferty, Appalachian; Sept 24, 1928; re-edited by Ron Yates 8/1/2010) 
Yates, Benjamin (I14367)
 
184 (Source: REVOLUTIONARY RECORD OF AMARIAH YATES; A PIONEER AT APALACHIN, COMES TO LIGHT; From an Article in the Owego Gazette, Oct. 18, 1928; by Charles C. Cafferty; Researches made by Charles Cafferty determines that he served as a Private in the Smithfield and Cumberland Rangers - He removed with his family in 1790 from Massachusetts to Appalachian Creek - The date of his death and his burial are unknown-He leaves numerous descendants.)

The earliest record we now have of Amariah Yates (originally spelled YEATES) was taken from the town clerk's book at Mendon, Worcester Co. Mass. It stated Amariah Yeates, of Smithfield RI married Margaret Thayer, of Mendon, April 1, 1773. Prior to Amariah's residence at Smithfield RI, he lived at Uxbridge Mass. Margaret Thayer, wife of Amariah, had a sister, Mercy, who married Barzette Yeates. Barzette may have been a brother of Amariah. Nothing is now known of Amariah's earlier family history or descent.

Margaret Thayer was the daughter of Thomas Thayer, born 1722, who married Susanna Blake. Thomas was the fourth son of Hon. Thomas who married Ruth Darling in 1715. Hon Thomas was the second oldest of ten children of Capt. Thomas Thayer and Mary Adams, who married in 1688. Capt. Thomas was the sixth son of Ferdinando Thayer, who married Huldah Howard, of Braintree, Mass in 1652. Ferdinando was the second son of Thomas Thayer who Marjorie (?) in England, and who died at Mendon Mass. in 1715. Thomas and his brother, Richard came from Braintree, England to John Winthrop's Massachusetts Colony prior to 1636 for at that date they were land owners at Braintree Mass.

Military papers, RI Historical Society, Mss. 239, state that Amariah Yeates served as a Private with the Smithfield and Cumberland Rangers in May 1776; A Military census taken in 1777 listing men between the ages of 16 and 50 "able to bear arms" includes the name of Amariah Yeates, a resident of Smithfield; Hospital papers, RI Historical Society, state that Amariah served as a Private in Col. George Peck's Independent Company of the Smithfield and Cumberland Rangers, under Capt. William Bowen. His name appears on a return of arms, etc. dated Smithfield, Oct. 18, 1779; these service records were furnished by the RI state record commissioner at Providence. They are official and will be accepted by the patriotic societies in case any descendent desires to make application for membership. There are no service records in the files in Washington.

A local history states that Amariah Yates located near the mouth of the Appalachian Creek. In 1791 when the districts were assigned for the first river road, Amariah Yates (there spelled incorrectly, spelled Ates) was listed in district number 3 the west end of which was somewhat above the Appalachian Creek. Therefore soldier Yates and his family removed from Massachusetts to the flats of the Appalachian Creek between 1790 and 1791. Jan 13, 1799, Amariah purchased from his Son-in-law, Jehu Barney, for $500, a part of lot 84 in the McMaster Half Township. This deed was witnessed by Lemuel Yates, Pardon Yates and Ellick Yeates (probably Alexander). This land included farms later owned by Tilbury and Decker and bordered Barnes Creek a mile east of Owego (NY).

Kingman County History names our pioneers in 1802. The names are in two lists. One list includes persons on and the other, persons not on Coxe's Patent. Amariah's name is here included on the latter list. This would indicate that he had removed from his first home along Appalachian Creek, which is within the Coxe grant. Amariah may have lived on the Barnes Creek land for a time. Family tradition indicates that died near his first home by the Appalachian Creek.

Lemuel, son of Amariah, married Lucinda, daughter of Francis Norwood. In 1801 Lemuel and Francis removed from Appalachian to the town of Caroline near the village of Slaterville. Lemuel purchased his 107 acre farm there in 1814. In 1810, Lemuel was a Captain of Militia at General Training in Owego. He had children. 1. Stephen 2. Amariah 3. Benjamin 4. Francis 5. William 6. Joseph 7. Lydia 8. Miranda 9. Canvice 10 Mary

Pardon, son of Amariah, married Lydia, daughter of Thomas TRACY, and aunt of COL. BENJ. TRACY. Pardon married second Elizabeth, twin of Catherine and daughter of Maria Johnson and Francis Earsley, a Revolutionary Soldier, who died at Roxbury NJ in 1790. Widow Maria Johnson Earsley and her family were the first permanent settlers in the town of Caroline in 1794. In 1812, Pardon was Ensign at General Training in Owego. In 1821 he lived on the newly surveyed lot 90 of Coxe's Patent. He then had a log house and barn and 60 of his 117 acres improved. The log house was located on the little creek next above Appalachian Creek. Thereby the state road and railroad still stand some struggling apple trees to mark the site. Pardon died here in August, 1833. He was buried in the old part of the Appalachian Cemetery. There was no headstone. Widow Elizabeth who settled Pardon's estate June 10, 1834, lived in the log house for a time. She finally disposed of her squatter rights here and purchased a farm on the hill, up the first road above the Appalachian Creek. She divided this property between her two sons, Tracy and Johnson, with the provision that she should be maintained. Tracy sold his part to Ira Edwards, the husband of Elizabeth, her daughter. Mother Elizabeth spent her remaining days with Elizabeth and Ira and buried in the Edwards Lot in the Appalachian Cemetery. There was no Headstone. She was born Nov. 2, 1789 and died July 20, 1888.

Gilbert, son of Amariah, married Polly Frear. In 1821 Gilbert was a squatter above his brother, Pardon, on lot 93 and on one-half of lot 94, the other half of which was taken by David Brown. The surveyor's field book credits Gilbert with a log house and barn and 25 acres improved. The log house stood near the present Glann district school house. He never purchased this land, but sold his squatter rights probably to Josiah Davison, who built a frame house where George Glann now lives. Gilbert removed to a house in Appalachia, razed in 1927 by George Tracy. The house stood on the east side of the Appalachian Creek Road, just beyond the road forking westward and winding back to the village. It was one of the oldest houses in town. Alanson Goodenow, aged 86 years, said he was born there. It was later owned by Peter Yaple, who sold it to Stephen Holmes. A story is still told of a bear carrying away the Yates stock.

Cyrene, daughter of Amariah, married David Smith, of Appalachian.

Laben J. Yates married Mary, the widow of Dr. Wright.

Benjamin Yates married Lucy Goodenow, the sister Chauncey Goodenow.

Paul, son of Amariah, b. 1781 d 1834, married Elizabeth b. 1791 d. 1842, who was possibly a Bates. Paul and also his family died comparatively young leaving meager records. He resided in the west side of Barnes Creek on a part of the lot 84 formerly owned by his father, Amariah. Six weeks before Paul died he purchased his brother, Lemuel's, "undivided ninth part of lot 84, being the share of Lemuel in the real estate left by his father, Amariah Yates."

Alexander, son of Amariah, b. March 21, 1784, at Mendon Mass. d. June 20, 1866, married Sept 1807, Polly Camp, daughter of Col Asa Camp, Revolutionary Soldier. Polly b. Nov 23, 1791 d. Aug. 2, 1867. Their Photographs are still preserved. Alexander resided on the east side of Barnes Creek adjoining his brother, Paul, on a part of lot 84 formerly owned by his father Amariah. In 1830, he purchased his brother Pardon's "undivided ninth part of this lot 84. in his possession now being." Alexander and Paul are buried in the nearby LaMont Cemetery.

Ruth and Hope were daughters of Amariah, but there are no records of these two daughters.

Tabarah (or Tabatha) daughter of Amariah, married Jehu Barney, son of Major David Barney, Revolutionary soldier.

Thus is accounted for the nine children of Amariah Yates, conforming to the phrase in the two deeds mentioned above "one undivided ninth part of"

(By Charles Cafferty, Appalachian; Sept 24, 1928; re-edited by Ron Yates 8/1/2010) 
Yates, Paul (I14368)
 
185 (Source: REVOLUTIONARY RECORD OF AMARIAH YATES; A PIONEER AT APALACHIN, COMES TO LIGHT; From an Article in the Owego Gazette, Oct. 18, 1928; by Charles C. Cafferty; Researches made by Charles Cafferty determines that he served as a Private in the Smithfield and Cumberland Rangers - He removed with his family in 1790 from Massachusetts to Appalachian Creek - The date of his death and his burial are unknown-He leaves numerous descendants.)

The earliest record we now have of Amariah Yates (originally spelled YEATES) was taken from the town clerk's book at Mendon, Worcester Co. Mass. It stated Amariah Yeates, of Smithfield RI married Margaret Thayer, of Mendon, April 1, 1773. Prior to Amariah's residence at Smithfield RI, he lived at Uxbridge Mass. Margaret Thayer, wife of Amariah, had a sister, Mercy, who married Barzette Yeates. Barzette may have been a brother of Amariah. Nothing is now known of Amariah's earlier family history or descent.

Margaret Thayer was the daughter of Thomas Thayer, born 1722, who married Susanna Blake. Thomas was the fourth son of Hon. Thomas who married Ruth Darling in 1715. Hon Thomas was the second oldest of ten children of Capt. Thomas Thayer and Mary Adams, who married in 1688. Capt. Thomas was the sixth son of Ferdinando Thayer, who married Huldah Howard, of Braintree, Mass in 1652. Ferdinando was the second son of Thomas Thayer who Marjorie (?) in England, and who died at Mendon Mass. in 1715. Thomas and his brother, Richard came from Braintree, England to John Winthrop's Massachusetts Colony prior to 1636 for at that date they were land owners at Braintree Mass.

Military papers, RI Historical Society, Mss. 239, state that Amariah Yeates served as a Private with the Smithfield and Cumberland Rangers in May 1776; A Military census taken in 1777 listing men between the ages of 16 and 50 "able to bear arms" includes the name of Amariah Yeates, a resident of Smithfield; Hospital papers, RI Historical Society, state that Amariah served as a Private in Col. George Peck's Independent Company of the Smithfield and Cumberland Rangers, under Capt. William Bowen. His name appears on a return of arms, etc. dated Smithfield, Oct. 18, 1779; these service records were furnished by the RI state record commissioner at Providence. They are official and will be accepted by the patriotic societies in case any descendent desires to make application for membership. There are no service records in the files in Washington.

A local history states that Amariah Yates located near the mouth of the Appalachian Creek. In 1791 when the districts were assigned for the first river road, Amariah Yates (there spelled incorrectly, spelled Ates) was listed in district number 3 the west end of which was somewhat above the Appalachian Creek. Therefore soldier Yates and his family removed from Massachusetts to the flats of the Appalachian Creek between 1790 and 1791. Jan 13, 1799, Amariah purchased from his Son-in-law, Jehu Barney, for $500, a part of lot 84 in the McMaster Half Township. This deed was witnessed by Lemuel Yates, Pardon Yates and Ellick Yeates (probably Alexander). This land included farms later owned by Tilbury and Decker and bordered Barnes Creek a mile east of Owego (NY).

Kingman County History names our pioneers in 1802. The names are in two lists. One list includes persons on and the other, persons not on Coxe's Patent. Amariah's name is here included on the latter list. This would indicate that he had removed from his first home along Appalachian Creek, which is within the Coxe grant. Amariah may have lived on the Barnes Creek land for a time. Family tradition indicates that died near his first home by the Appalachian Creek.

Lemuel, son of Amariah, married Lucinda, daughter of Francis Norwood. In 1801 Lemuel and Francis removed from Appalachian to the town of Caroline near the village of Slaterville. Lemuel purchased his 107 acre farm there in 1814. In 1810, Lemuel was a Captain of Militia at General Training in Owego. He had children. 1. Stephen 2. Amariah 3. Benjamin 4. Francis 5. William 6. Joseph 7. Lydia 8. Miranda 9. Canvice 10 Mary

Pardon, son of Amariah, married Lydia, daughter of Thomas TRACY, and aunt of COL. BENJ. TRACY. Pardon married second Elizabeth, twin of Catherine and daughter of Maria Johnson and Francis Earsley, a Revolutionary Soldier, who died at Roxbury NJ in 1790. Widow Maria Johnson Earsley and her family were the first permanent settlers in the town of Caroline in 1794. In 1812, Pardon was Ensign at General Training in Owego. In 1821 he lived on the newly surveyed lot 90 of Coxe's Patent. He then had a log house and barn and 60 of his 117 acres improved. The log house was located on the little creek next above Appalachian Creek. Thereby the state road and railroad still stand some struggling apple trees to mark the site. Pardon died here in August, 1833. He was buried in the old part of the Appalachian Cemetery. There was no headstone. Widow Elizabeth who settled Pardon's estate June 10, 1834, lived in the log house for a time. She finally disposed of her squatter rights here and purchased a farm on the hill, up the first road above the Appalachian Creek. She divided this property between her two sons, Tracy and Johnson, with the provision that she should be maintained. Tracy sold his part to Ira Edwards, the husband of Elizabeth, her daughter. Mother Elizabeth spent her remaining days with Elizabeth and Ira and buried in the Edwards Lot in the Appalachian Cemetery. There was no Headstone. She was born Nov. 2, 1789 and died July 20, 1888.

Gilbert, son of Amariah, married Polly Frear. In 1821 Gilbert was a squatter above his brother, Pardon, on lot 93 and on one-half of lot 94, the other half of which was taken by David Brown. The surveyor's field book credits Gilbert with a log house and barn and 25 acres improved. The log house stood near the present Glann district school house. He never purchased this land, but sold his squatter rights probably to Josiah Davison, who built a frame house where George Glann now lives. Gilbert removed to a house in Appalachia, razed in 1927 by George Tracy. The house stood on the east side of the Appalachian Creek Road, just beyond the road forking westward and winding back to the village. It was one of the oldest houses in town. Alanson Goodenow, aged 86 years, said he was born there. It was later owned by Peter Yaple, who sold it to Stephen Holmes. A story is still told of a bear carrying away the Yates stock.

Cyrene, daughter of Amariah, married David Smith, of Appalachian.

Laben J. Yates married Mary, the widow of Dr. Wright.

Benjamin Yates married Lucy Goodenow, the sister Chauncey Goodenow.

Paul, son of Amariah, b. 1781 d 1834, married Elizabeth b. 1791 d. 1842, who was possibly a Bates. Paul and also his family died comparatively young leaving meager records. He resided in the west side of Barnes Creek on a part of the lot 84 formerly owned by his father, Amariah. Six weeks before Paul died he purchased his brother, Lemuel's, "undivided ninth part of lot 84, being the share of Lemuel in the real estate left by his father, Amariah Yates."

Alexander, son of Amariah, b. March 21, 1784, at Mendon Mass. d. June 20, 1866, married Sept 1807, Polly Camp, daughter of Col Asa Camp, Revolutionary Soldier. Polly b. Nov 23, 1791 d. Aug. 2, 1867. Their Photographs are still preserved. Alexander resided on the east side of Barnes Creek adjoining his brother, Paul, on a part of lot 84 formerly owned by his father Amariah. In 1830, he purchased his brother Pardon's "undivided ninth part of this lot 84. in his possession now being." Alexander and Paul are buried in the nearby LaMont Cemetery.

Ruth and Hope were daughters of Amariah, but there are no records of these two daughters.

Tabarah (or Tabatha) daughter of Amariah, married Jehu Barney, son of Major David Barney, Revolutionary soldier.

Thus is accounted for the nine children of Amariah Yates, conforming to the phrase in the two deeds mentioned above "one undivided ninth part of"

(By Charles Cafferty, Appalachian; Sept 24, 1928; re-edited by Ron Yates 8/1/2010) 
Yates, Alexander (I14369)
 
186 (Source: REVOLUTIONARY RECORD OF AMARIAH YATES; A PIONEER AT APALACHIN, COMES TO LIGHT; From an Article in the Owego Gazette, Oct. 18, 1928; by Charles C. Cafferty; Researches made by Charles Cafferty determines that he served as a Private in the Smithfield and Cumberland Rangers - He removed with his family in 1790 from Massachusetts to Appalachian Creek - The date of his death and his burial are unknown-He leaves numerous descendants.)

The earliest record we now have of Amariah Yates (originally spelled YEATES) was taken from the town clerk's book at Mendon, Worcester Co. Mass. It stated Amariah Yeates, of Smithfield RI married Margaret Thayer, of Mendon, April 1, 1773. Prior to Amariah's residence at Smithfield RI, he lived at Uxbridge Mass. Margaret Thayer, wife of Amariah, had a sister, Mercy, who married Barzette Yeates. Barzette may have been a brother of Amariah. Nothing is now known of Amariah's earlier family history or descent.

Margaret Thayer was the daughter of Thomas Thayer, born 1722, who married Susanna Blake. Thomas was the fourth son of Hon. Thomas who married Ruth Darling in 1715. Hon Thomas was the second oldest of ten children of Capt. Thomas Thayer and Mary Adams, who married in 1688. Capt. Thomas was the sixth son of Ferdinando Thayer, who married Huldah Howard, of Braintree, Mass in 1652. Ferdinando was the second son of Thomas Thayer who Marjorie (?) in England, and who died at Mendon Mass. in 1715. Thomas and his brother, Richard came from Braintree, England to John Winthrop's Massachusetts Colony prior to 1636 for at that date they were land owners at Braintree Mass.

Military papers, RI Historical Society, Mss. 239, state that Amariah Yeates served as a Private with the Smithfield and Cumberland Rangers in May 1776; A Military census taken in 1777 listing men between the ages of 16 and 50 "able to bear arms" includes the name of Amariah Yeates, a resident of Smithfield; Hospital papers, RI Historical Society, state that Amariah served as a Private in Col. George Peck's Independent Company of the Smithfield and Cumberland Rangers, under Capt. William Bowen. His name appears on a return of arms, etc. dated Smithfield, Oct. 18, 1779; these service records were furnished by the RI state record commissioner at Providence. They are official and will be accepted by the patriotic societies in case any descendent desires to make application for membership. There are no service records in the files in Washington.

A local history states that Amariah Yates located near the mouth of the Appalachian Creek. In 1791 when the districts were assigned for the first river road, Amariah Yates (there spelled incorrectly, spelled Ates) was listed in district number 3 the west end of which was somewhat above the Appalachian Creek. Therefore soldier Yates and his family removed from Massachusetts to the flats of the Appalachian Creek between 1790 and 1791. Jan 13, 1799, Amariah purchased from his Son-in-law, Jehu Barney, for $500, a part of lot 84 in the McMaster Half Township. This deed was witnessed by Lemuel Yates, Pardon Yates and Ellick Yeates (probably Alexander). This land included farms later owned by Tilbury and Decker and bordered Barnes Creek a mile east of Owego (NY).

Kingman County History names our pioneers in 1802. The names are in two lists. One list includes persons on and the other, persons not on Coxe's Patent. Amariah's name is here included on the latter list. This would indicate that he had removed from his first home along Appalachian Creek, which is within the Coxe grant. Amariah may have lived on the Barnes Creek land for a time. Family tradition indicates that died near his first home by the Appalachian Creek.

Lemuel, son of Amariah, married Lucinda, daughter of Francis Norwood. In 1801 Lemuel and Francis removed from Appalachian to the town of Caroline near the village of Slaterville. Lemuel purchased his 107 acre farm there in 1814. In 1810, Lemuel was a Captain of Militia at General Training in Owego. He had children. 1. Stephen 2. Amariah 3. Benjamin 4. Francis 5. William 6. Joseph 7. Lydia 8. Miranda 9. Canvice 10 Mary

Pardon, son of Amariah, married Lydia, daughter of Thomas TRACY, and aunt of COL. BENJ. TRACY. Pardon married second Elizabeth, twin of Catherine and daughter of Maria Johnson and Francis Earsley, a Revolutionary Soldier, who died at Roxbury NJ in 1790. Widow Maria Johnson Earsley and her family were the first permanent settlers in the town of Caroline in 1794. In 1812, Pardon was Ensign at General Training in Owego. In 1821 he lived on the newly surveyed lot 90 of Coxe's Patent. He then had a log house and barn and 60 of his 117 acres improved. The log house was located on the little creek next above Appalachian Creek. Thereby the state road and railroad still stand some struggling apple trees to mark the site. Pardon died here in August, 1833. He was buried in the old part of the Appalachian Cemetery. There was no headstone. Widow Elizabeth who settled Pardon's estate June 10, 1834, lived in the log house for a time. She finally disposed of her squatter rights here and purchased a farm on the hill, up the first road above the Appalachian Creek. She divided this property between her two sons, Tracy and Johnson, with the provision that she should be maintained. Tracy sold his part to Ira Edwards, the husband of Elizabeth, her daughter. Mother Elizabeth spent her remaining days with Elizabeth and Ira and buried in the Edwards Lot in the Appalachian Cemetery. There was no Headstone. She was born Nov. 2, 1789 and died July 20, 1888.

Gilbert, son of Amariah, married Polly Frear. In 1821 Gilbert was a squatter above his brother, Pardon, on lot 93 and on one-half of lot 94, the other half of which was taken by David Brown. The surveyor's field book credits Gilbert with a log house and barn and 25 acres improved. The log house stood near the present Glann district school house. He never purchased this land, but sold his squatter rights probably to Josiah Davison, who built a frame house where George Glann now lives. Gilbert removed to a house in Appalachia, razed in 1927 by George Tracy. The house stood on the east side of the Appalachian Creek Road, just beyond the road forking westward and winding back to the village. It was one of the oldest houses in town. Alanson Goodenow, aged 86 years, said he was born there. It was later owned by Peter Yaple, who sold it to Stephen Holmes. A story is still told of a bear carrying away the Yates stock.

Cyrene, daughter of Amariah, married David Smith, of Appalachian.

Laben J. Yates married Mary, the widow of Dr. Wright.

Benjamin Yates married Lucy Goodenow, the sister Chauncey Goodenow.

Paul, son of Amariah, b. 1781 d 1834, married Elizabeth b. 1791 d. 1842, who was possibly a Bates. Paul and also his family died comparatively young leaving meager records. He resided in the west side of Barnes Creek on a part of the lot 84 formerly owned by his father, Amariah. Six weeks before Paul died he purchased his brother, Lemuel's, "undivided ninth part of lot 84, being the share of Lemuel in the real estate left by his father, Amariah Yates."

Alexander, son of Amariah, b. March 21, 1784, at Mendon Mass. d. June 20, 1866, married Sept 1807, Polly Camp, daughter of Col Asa Camp, Revolutionary Soldier. Polly b. Nov 23, 1791 d. Aug. 2, 1867. Their Photographs are still preserved. Alexander resided on the east side of Barnes Creek adjoining his brother, Paul, on a part of lot 84 formerly owned by his father Amariah. In 1830, he purchased his brother Pardon's "undivided ninth part of this lot 84. in his possession now being." Alexander and Paul are buried in the nearby LaMont Cemetery.

Ruth and Hope were daughters of Amariah, but there are no records of these two daughters.

Tabarah (or Tabatha) daughter of Amariah, married Jehu Barney, son of Major David Barney, Revolutionary soldier.

Thus is accounted for the nine children of Amariah Yates, conforming to the phrase in the two deeds mentioned above "one undivided ninth part of"

(By Charles Cafferty, Appalachian; Sept 24, 1928; re-edited by Ron Yates 8/1/2010) 
Yates, Ruth (I14370)
 
187 (Source: REVOLUTIONARY RECORD OF AMARIAH YATES; A PIONEER AT APALACHIN, COMES TO LIGHT; From an Article in the Owego Gazette, Oct. 18, 1928; by Charles C. Cafferty; Researches made by Charles Cafferty determines that he served as a Private in the Smithfield and Cumberland Rangers - He removed with his family in 1790 from Massachusetts to Appalachian Creek - The date of his death and his burial are unknown-He leaves numerous descendants.)

The earliest record we now have of Amariah Yates (originally spelled YEATES) was taken from the town clerk's book at Mendon, Worcester Co. Mass. It stated Amariah Yeates, of Smithfield RI married Margaret Thayer, of Mendon, April 1, 1773. Prior to Amariah's residence at Smithfield RI, he lived at Uxbridge Mass. Margaret Thayer, wife of Amariah, had a sister, Mercy, who married Barzette Yeates. Barzette may have been a brother of Amariah. Nothing is now known of Amariah's earlier family history or descent.

Margaret Thayer was the daughter of Thomas Thayer, born 1722, who married Susanna Blake. Thomas was the fourth son of Hon. Thomas who married Ruth Darling in 1715. Hon Thomas was the second oldest of ten children of Capt. Thomas Thayer and Mary Adams, who married in 1688. Capt. Thomas was the sixth son of Ferdinando Thayer, who married Huldah Howard, of Braintree, Mass in 1652. Ferdinando was the second son of Thomas Thayer who Marjorie (?) in England, and who died at Mendon Mass. in 1715. Thomas and his brother, Richard came from Braintree, England to John Winthrop's Massachusetts Colony prior to 1636 for at that date they were land owners at Braintree Mass.

Military papers, RI Historical Society, Mss. 239, state that Amariah Yeates served as a Private with the Smithfield and Cumberland Rangers in May 1776; A Military census taken in 1777 listing men between the ages of 16 and 50 "able to bear arms" includes the name of Amariah Yeates, a resident of Smithfield; Hospital papers, RI Historical Society, state that Amariah served as a Private in Col. George Peck's Independent Company of the Smithfield and Cumberland Rangers, under Capt. William Bowen. His name appears on a return of arms, etc. dated Smithfield, Oct. 18, 1779; these service records were furnished by the RI state record commissioner at Providence. They are official and will be accepted by the patriotic societies in case any descendent desires to make application for membership. There are no service records in the files in Washington.

A local history states that Amariah Yates located near the mouth of the Appalachian Creek. In 1791 when the districts were assigned for the first river road, Amariah Yates (there spelled incorrectly, spelled Ates) was listed in district number 3 the west end of which was somewhat above the Appalachian Creek. Therefore soldier Yates and his family removed from Massachusetts to the flats of the Appalachian Creek between 1790 and 1791. Jan 13, 1799, Amariah purchased from his Son-in-law, Jehu Barney, for $500, a part of lot 84 in the McMaster Half Township. This deed was witnessed by Lemuel Yates, Pardon Yates and Ellick Yeates (probably Alexander). This land included farms later owned by Tilbury and Decker and bordered Barnes Creek a mile east of Owego (NY).

Kingman County History names our pioneers in 1802. The names are in two lists. One list includes persons on and the other, persons not on Coxe's Patent. Amariah's name is here included on the latter list. This would indicate that he had removed from his first home along Appalachian Creek, which is within the Coxe grant. Amariah may have lived on the Barnes Creek land for a time. Family tradition indicates that died near his first home by the Appalachian Creek.

Lemuel, son of Amariah, married Lucinda, daughter of Francis Norwood. In 1801 Lemuel and Francis removed from Appalachian to the town of Caroline near the village of Slaterville. Lemuel purchased his 107 acre farm there in 1814. In 1810, Lemuel was a Captain of Militia at General Training in Owego. He had children. 1. Stephen 2. Amariah 3. Benjamin 4. Francis 5. William 6. Joseph 7. Lydia 8. Miranda 9. Canvice 10 Mary

Pardon, son of Amariah, married Lydia, daughter of Thomas TRACY, and aunt of COL. BENJ. TRACY. Pardon married second Elizabeth, twin of Catherine and daughter of Maria Johnson and Francis Earsley, a Revolutionary Soldier, who died at Roxbury NJ in 1790. Widow Maria Johnson Earsley and her family were the first permanent settlers in the town of Caroline in 1794. In 1812, Pardon was Ensign at General Training in Owego. In 1821 he lived on the newly surveyed lot 90 of Coxe's Patent. He then had a log house and barn and 60 of his 117 acres improved. The log house was located on the little creek next above Appalachian Creek. Thereby the state road and railroad still stand some struggling apple trees to mark the site. Pardon died here in August, 1833. He was buried in the old part of the Appalachian Cemetery. There was no headstone. Widow Elizabeth who settled Pardon's estate June 10, 1834, lived in the log house for a time. She finally disposed of her squatter rights here and purchased a farm on the hill, up the first road above the Appalachian Creek. She divided this property between her two sons, Tracy and Johnson, with the provision that she should be maintained. Tracy sold his part to Ira Edwards, the husband of Elizabeth, her daughter. Mother Elizabeth spent her remaining days with Elizabeth and Ira and buried in the Edwards Lot in the Appalachian Cemetery. There was no Headstone. She was born Nov. 2, 1789 and died July 20, 1888.

Gilbert, son of Amariah, married Polly Frear. In 1821 Gilbert was a squatter above his brother, Pardon, on lot 93 and on one-half of lot 94, the other half of which was taken by David Brown. The surveyor's field book credits Gilbert with a log house and barn and 25 acres improved. The log house stood near the present Glann district school house. He never purchased this land, but sold his squatter rights probably to Josiah Davison, who built a frame house where George Glann now lives. Gilbert removed to a house in Appalachia, razed in 1927 by George Tracy. The house stood on the east side of the Appalachian Creek Road, just beyond the road forking westward and winding back to the village. It was one of the oldest houses in town. Alanson Goodenow, aged 86 years, said he was born there. It was later owned by Peter Yaple, who sold it to Stephen Holmes. A story is still told of a bear carrying away the Yates stock.

Cyrene, daughter of Amariah, married David Smith, of Appalachian.

Laben J. Yates married Mary, the widow of Dr. Wright.

Benjamin Yates married Lucy Goodenow, the sister Chauncey Goodenow.

Paul, son of Amariah, b. 1781 d 1834, married Elizabeth b. 1791 d. 1842, who was possibly a Bates. Paul and also his family died comparatively young leaving meager records. He resided in the west side of Barnes Creek on a part of the lot 84 formerly owned by his father, Amariah. Six weeks before Paul died he purchased his brother, Lemuel's, "undivided ninth part of lot 84, being the share of Lemuel in the real estate left by his father, Amariah Yates."

Alexander, son of Amariah, b. March 21, 1784, at Mendon Mass. d. June 20, 1866, married Sept 1807, Polly Camp, daughter of Col Asa Camp, Revolutionary Soldier. Polly b. Nov 23, 1791 d. Aug. 2, 1867. Their Photographs are still preserved. Alexander resided on the east side of Barnes Creek adjoining his brother, Paul, on a part of lot 84 formerly owned by his father Amariah. In 1830, he purchased his brother Pardon's "undivided ninth part of this lot 84. in his possession now being." Alexander and Paul are buried in the nearby LaMont Cemetery.

Ruth and Hope were daughters of Amariah, but there are no records of these two daughters.

Tabarah (or Tabatha) daughter of Amariah, married Jehu Barney, son of Major David Barney, Revolutionary soldier.

Thus is accounted for the nine children of Amariah Yates, conforming to the phrase in the two deeds mentioned above "one undivided ninth part of"

(By Charles Cafferty, Appalachian; Sept 24, 1928; re-edited by Ron Yates 8/1/2010) 
Yates, Tabatha (I14372)
 
188 (Source: roger@RoCeMaBra.com; 5/5/2012); Another reference (Kentucky, Statewide - Marriages early to 1800) indicates "Samuel Grimes m. Elizabeth Speer in Shelby Co., KY 10 Aug 1815."

I've looked at various references for Samuel Grimes and Sarah Gobel/Elizabeth Spears, and come to these conclusions (names and dates from Chuck Elledge's "Elledge Family Tree" site):

Probably child of Susan Goble

Sarah "Sally" GRIMES b. 17 Jun 1811 d. 2 Jul 1895 m. James BENNETT, Sr. b. 31 Dec 1819 d. 27 Oct 1891

Probably children of Elizabeth Spears

John GRIMES b. 5 Apr 1819 d. 10 Oct 1899
m. Mary SANDS b. 1820 d. 3 Dec 1859
m. Zeporah SANDS b. 25 Jan 1825 d. 29 Sep 1883
m. Susannah BROWN b. 1824 d. Y
Barbara GRIMES b. 1820 d. 2 Jul 1911
m. William BENNETT b. 5 Oct 1823 d. Y
m. Henry F. ROBBINS d. Bef 1841
Leonard GRIMES b. 1825 d. 1870-1880 m. Philena J. MONK b. 1831 d. Y
Elizabeth GRIMES b. 1826 d. Y m. Jesse Edward MORGAN b. 1823 d. Y
Benjamin A. GRIMES b. 1827-1828 d. Y m. Menerva PARKS b. 1834 d. 1909
Samuel GRIMES b. 1830 d. 1913 m. Arrabelle HUNT b. 1832 d. Y
Abraham GRIMES b. 1831 d. Y m. Sarah PRUETT b. 1833 d. Y
Nancy GRIMES b. 1832-1834 d. Y m. George Washington BENNETT b. 17 May 1827 d. 1912
Katherine "Kitty" GRIMES b. 1835 d. 1910
m. Harrison BENNETT b. 22 May 1832 d. 21 Jun 1858
m. John Clark WELLMAN b. 1832-1836 d. Y
Dicie GRIMES b. 1837 d. 1919 m. Alonzo BENNETT b. 10 Dec 1836 d. 1912
So the math is correct (six sons married six daughters), when it come to Samuel Grimes, but only one child is Susan's; the remainder appear to be Elizabeth's.

Given birth dates from the Elledge Family Tree site, Sarah "Sally" Grimes seems to be the only child of Samuel and Susan. All others were born well after 1815. There is an eight year gap between Sarah and John. This raises questions that I have not yet been able to answer. Did Susan Goble die before 1815? Did they divorce? 
Spears, Elizabeth (I20232)
 
189 (Source: roger@RoCeMaBra.com; 5/5/2012); Another reference (Kentucky, Statewide - Marriages early to 1800) indicates "Samuel Grimes m. Elizabeth Speer in Shelby Co., KY 10 Aug 1815."

I've looked at various references for Samuel Grimes and Sarah Gobel/Elizabeth Spears, and come to these conclusions (names and dates from Chuck Elledge's "Elledge Family Tree" site):

Probably child of Susan Goble

Sarah "Sally" GRIMES b. 17 Jun 1811 d. 2 Jul 1895 m. James BENNETT, Sr. b. 31 Dec 1819 d. 27 Oct 1891

Probably children of Elizabeth Spears

John GRIMES b. 5 Apr 1819 d. 10 Oct 1899
m. Mary SANDS b. 1820 d. 3 Dec 1859
m. Zeporah SANDS b. 25 Jan 1825 d. 29 Sep 1883
m. Susannah BROWN b. 1824 d. Y

Barbara GRIMES b. 1820 d. 2 Jul 1911
m. William BENNETT b. 5 Oct 1823 d. Y
m. Henry F. ROBBINS d. Bef 1841
Leonard GRIMES b. 1825 d. 1870-1880 m. Philena J. MONK b. 1831 d. Y
Elizabeth GRIMES b. 1826 d. Y m. Jesse Edward MORGAN b. 1823 d. Y
Benjamin A. GRIMES b. 1827-1828 d. Y m. Menerva PARKS b. 1834 d. 1909
Samuel GRIMES b. 1830 d. 1913 m. Arrabelle HUNT b. 1832 d. Y
Abraham GRIMES b. 1831 d. Y m. Sarah PRUETT b. 1833 d. Y
Nancy GRIMES b. 1832-1834 d. Y m. George Washington BENNETT b. 17 May 1827 d. 1912
Katherine "Kitty" GRIMES b. 1835 d. 1910
m. Harrison BENNETT b. 22 May 1832 d. 21 Jun 1858
m. John Clark WELLMAN b. 1832-1836 d. Y
Dicie GRIMES b. 1837 d. 1919 m. Alonzo BENNETT b. 10 Dec 1836 d. 1912

So the math is correct (six sons married six daughters), when it come to Samuel Grimes, but only one child is Susan's; the remainder appear to be Elizabeth's.

Given birth dates from the Elledge Family Tree site, Sarah "Sally" Grimes seems to be the only child of Samuel and Susan. All others were born well after 1815. There is an eight year gap between Sarah and John. This raises questions that I have not yet been able to answer. Did Susan Goble die before 1815? Did they divorce? 
Grimes, John W. (I20233)
 
190 (Source: roger@RoCeMaBra.com; 5/5/2012); Another reference (Kentucky, Statewide - Marriages early to 1800) indicates "Samuel Grimes m. Elizabeth Speer in Shelby Co., KY 10 Aug 1815."

I've looked at various references for Samuel Grimes and Sarah Gobel/Elizabeth Spears, and come to these conclusions (names and dates from Chuck Elledge's "Elledge Family Tree" site):

Probably child of Susan Goble

Sarah "Sally" GRIMES b. 17 Jun 1811 d. 2 Jul 1895 m. James BENNETT, Sr. b. 31 Dec 1819 d. 27 Oct 1891

Probably children of Elizabeth Spears

John GRIMES b. 5 Apr 1819 d. 10 Oct 1899
m. Mary SANDS b. 1820 d. 3 Dec 1859
m. Zeporah SANDS b. 25 Jan 1825 d. 29 Sep 1883
m. Susannah BROWN b. 1824 d. Y

Barbara GRIMES b. 1820 d. 2 Jul 1911
m. William BENNETT b. 5 Oct 1823 d. Y
m. Henry F. ROBBINS d. Bef 1841
Leonard GRIMES b. 1825 d. 1870-1880 m. Philena J. MONK b. 1831 d. Y
Elizabeth GRIMES b. 1826 d. Y m. Jesse Edward MORGAN b. 1823 d. Y
Benjamin A. GRIMES b. 1827-1828 d. Y m. Menerva PARKS b. 1834 d. 1909
Samuel GRIMES b. 1830 d. 1913 m. Arrabelle HUNT b. 1832 d. Y
Abraham GRIMES b. 1831 d. Y m. Sarah PRUETT b. 1833 d. Y
Nancy GRIMES b. 1832-1834 d. Y m. George Washington BENNETT b. 17 May 1827 d. 1912
Katherine "Kitty" GRIMES b. 1835 d. 1910
m. Harrison BENNETT b. 22 May 1832 d. 21 Jun 1858
m. John Clark WELLMAN b. 1832-1836 d. Y
Dicie GRIMES b. 1837 d. 1919 m. Alonzo BENNETT b. 10 Dec 1836 d. 1912

So the math is correct (six sons married six daughters), when it come to Samuel Grimes, but only one child is Susan's; the remainder appear to be Elizabeth's.

Given birth dates from the Elledge Family Tree site, Sarah "Sally" Grimes seems to be the only child of Samuel and Susan. All others were born well after 1815. There is an eight year gap between Sarah and John. This raises questions that I have not yet been able to answer. Did Susan Goble die before 1815? Did they divorce? 
Grimes, Barbara (I20234)
 
191 (Source: roger@RoCeMaBra.com; 5/5/2012); Another reference (Kentucky, Statewide - Marriages early to 1800) indicates "Samuel Grimes m. Elizabeth Speer in Shelby Co., KY 10 Aug 1815."

I've looked at various references for Samuel Grimes and Sarah Gobel/Elizabeth Spears, and come to these conclusions (names and dates from Chuck Elledge's "Elledge Family Tree" site):

Probably child of Susan Goble

Sarah "Sally" GRIMES b. 17 Jun 1811 d. 2 Jul 1895 m. James BENNETT, Sr. b. 31 Dec 1819 d. 27 Oct 1891

Probably children of Elizabeth Spears

John GRIMES b. 5 Apr 1819 d. 10 Oct 1899
m. Mary SANDS b. 1820 d. 3 Dec 1859
m. Zeporah SANDS b. 25 Jan 1825 d. 29 Sep 1883
m. Susannah BROWN b. 1824 d. Y

Barbara GRIMES b. 1820 d. 2 Jul 1911
m. William BENNETT b. 5 Oct 1823 d. Y
m. Henry F. ROBBINS d. Bef 1841
Leonard GRIMES b. 1825 d. 1870-1880 m. Philena J. MONK b. 1831 d. Y
Elizabeth GRIMES b. 1826 d. Y m. Jesse Edward MORGAN b. 1823 d. Y
Benjamin A. GRIMES b. 1827-1828 d. Y m. Menerva PARKS b. 1834 d. 1909
Samuel GRIMES b. 1830 d. 1913 m. Arrabelle HUNT b. 1832 d. Y
Abraham GRIMES b. 1831 d. Y m. Sarah PRUETT b. 1833 d. Y
Nancy GRIMES b. 1832-1834 d. Y m. George Washington BENNETT b. 17 May 1827 d. 1912
Katherine "Kitty" GRIMES b. 1835 d. 1910
m. Harrison BENNETT b. 22 May 1832 d. 21 Jun 1858
m. John Clark WELLMAN b. 1832-1836 d. Y
Dicie GRIMES b. 1837 d. 1919 m. Alonzo BENNETT b. 10 Dec 1836 d. 1912

So the math is correct (six sons married six daughters), when it come to Samuel Grimes, but only one child is Susan's; the remainder appear to be Elizabeth's.

Given birth dates from the Elledge Family Tree site, Sarah "Sally" Grimes seems to be the only child of Samuel and Susan. All others were born well after 1815. There is an eight year gap between Sarah and John. This raises questions that I have not yet been able to answer. Did Susan Goble die before 1815? Did they divorce? 
Grimes, Leonard (I20236)
 
192 (Source: roger@RoCeMaBra.com; 5/5/2012); Another reference (Kentucky, Statewide - Marriages early to 1800) indicates "Samuel Grimes m. Elizabeth Speer in Shelby Co., KY 10 Aug 1815."

I've looked at various references for Samuel Grimes and Sarah Gobel/Elizabeth Spears, and come to these conclusions (names and dates from Chuck Elledge's "Elledge Family Tree" site):

Probably child of Susan Goble

Sarah "Sally" GRIMES b. 17 Jun 1811 d. 2 Jul 1895 m. James BENNETT, Sr. b. 31 Dec 1819 d. 27 Oct 1891

Probably children of Elizabeth Spears

John GRIMES b. 5 Apr 1819 d. 10 Oct 1899
m. Mary SANDS b. 1820 d. 3 Dec 1859
m. Zeporah SANDS b. 25 Jan 1825 d. 29 Sep 1883
m. Susannah BROWN b. 1824 d. Y

Barbara GRIMES b. 1820 d. 2 Jul 1911
m. William BENNETT b. 5 Oct 1823 d. Y
m. Henry F. ROBBINS d. Bef 1841
Leonard GRIMES b. 1825 d. 1870-1880 m. Philena J. MONK b. 1831 d. Y
Elizabeth GRIMES b. 1826 d. Y m. Jesse Edward MORGAN b. 1823 d. Y
Benjamin A. GRIMES b. 1827-1828 d. Y m. Menerva PARKS b. 1834 d. 1909
Samuel GRIMES b. 1830 d. 1913 m. Arrabelle HUNT b. 1832 d. Y
Abraham GRIMES b. 1831 d. Y m. Sarah PRUETT b. 1833 d. Y
Nancy GRIMES b. 1832-1834 d. Y m. George Washington BENNETT b. 17 May 1827 d. 1912
Katherine "Kitty" GRIMES b. 1835 d. 1910
m. Harrison BENNETT b. 22 May 1832 d. 21 Jun 1858
m. John Clark WELLMAN b. 1832-1836 d. Y
Dicie GRIMES b. 1837 d. 1919 m. Alonzo BENNETT b. 10 Dec 1836 d. 1912

So the math is correct (six sons married six daughters), when it come to Samuel Grimes, but only one child is Susan's; the remainder appear to be Elizabeth's.

Given birth dates from the Elledge Family Tree site, Sarah "Sally" Grimes seems to be the only child of Samuel and Susan. All others were born well after 1815. There is an eight year gap between Sarah and John. This raises questions that I have not yet been able to answer. Did Susan Goble die before 1815? Did they divorce? 
Grimes, Elizabeth (I20237)
 
193 (Source: roger@RoCeMaBra.com; 5/5/2012); Another reference (Kentucky, Statewide - Marriages early to 1800) indicates "Samuel Grimes m. Elizabeth Speer in Shelby Co., KY 10 Aug 1815."

I've looked at various references for Samuel Grimes and Sarah Gobel/Elizabeth Spears, and come to these conclusions (names and dates from Chuck Elledge's "Elledge Family Tree" site):

Probably child of Susan Goble

Sarah "Sally" GRIMES b. 17 Jun 1811 d. 2 Jul 1895 m. James BENNETT, Sr. b. 31 Dec 1819 d. 27 Oct 1891

Probably children of Elizabeth Spears

John GRIMES b. 5 Apr 1819 d. 10 Oct 1899
m. Mary SANDS b. 1820 d. 3 Dec 1859
m. Zeporah SANDS b. 25 Jan 1825 d. 29 Sep 1883
m. Susannah BROWN b. 1824 d. Y

Barbara GRIMES b. 1820 d. 2 Jul 1911
m. William BENNETT b. 5 Oct 1823 d. Y
m. Henry F. ROBBINS d. Bef 1841
Leonard GRIMES b. 1825 d. 1870-1880 m. Philena J. MONK b. 1831 d. Y
Elizabeth GRIMES b. 1826 d. Y m. Jesse Edward MORGAN b. 1823 d. Y
Benjamin A. GRIMES b. 1827-1828 d. Y m. Menerva PARKS b. 1834 d. 1909
Samuel GRIMES b. 1830 d. 1913 m. Arrabelle HUNT b. 1832 d. Y
Abraham GRIMES b. 1831 d. Y m. Sarah PRUETT b. 1833 d. Y
Nancy GRIMES b. 1832-1834 d. Y m. George Washington BENNETT b. 17 May 1827 d. 1912
Katherine "Kitty" GRIMES b. 1835 d. 1910
m. Harrison BENNETT b. 22 May 1832 d. 21 Jun 1858
m. John Clark WELLMAN b. 1832-1836 d. Y
Dicie GRIMES b. 1837 d. 1919 m. Alonzo BENNETT b. 10 Dec 1836 d. 1912

So the math is correct (six sons married six daughters), when it come to Samuel Grimes, but only one child is Susan's; the remainder appear to be Elizabeth's.

Given birth dates from the Elledge Family Tree site, Sarah "Sally" Grimes seems to be the only child of Samuel and Susan. All others were born well after 1815. There is an eight year gap between Sarah and John. This raises questions that I have not yet been able to answer. Did Susan Goble die before 1815? Did they divorce? 
Grimes, Benjamin A. (I20238)
 
194 (Source: roger@RoCeMaBra.com; 5/5/2012); Another reference (Kentucky, Statewide - Marriages early to 1800) indicates "Samuel Grimes m. Elizabeth Speer in Shelby Co., KY 10 Aug 1815."

I've looked at various references for Samuel Grimes and Sarah Gobel/Elizabeth Spears, and come to these conclusions (names and dates from Chuck Elledge's "Elledge Family Tree" site):

Probably child of Susan Goble

Sarah "Sally" GRIMES b. 17 Jun 1811 d. 2 Jul 1895 m. James BENNETT, Sr. b. 31 Dec 1819 d. 27 Oct 1891

Probably children of Elizabeth Spears

John GRIMES b. 5 Apr 1819 d. 10 Oct 1899
m. Mary SANDS b. 1820 d. 3 Dec 1859
m. Zeporah SANDS b. 25 Jan 1825 d. 29 Sep 1883
m. Susannah BROWN b. 1824 d. Y

Barbara GRIMES b. 1820 d. 2 Jul 1911
m. William BENNETT b. 5 Oct 1823 d. Y
m. Henry F. ROBBINS d. Bef 1841
Leonard GRIMES b. 1825 d. 1870-1880 m. Philena J. MONK b. 1831 d. Y
Elizabeth GRIMES b. 1826 d. Y m. Jesse Edward MORGAN b. 1823 d. Y
Benjamin A. GRIMES b. 1827-1828 d. Y m. Menerva PARKS b. 1834 d. 1909
Samuel GRIMES b. 1830 d. 1913 m. Arrabelle HUNT b. 1832 d. Y
Abraham GRIMES b. 1831 d. Y m. Sarah PRUETT b. 1833 d. Y
Nancy GRIMES b. 1832-1834 d. Y m. George Washington BENNETT b. 17 May 1827 d. 1912
Katherine "Kitty" GRIMES b. 1835 d. 1910
m. Harrison BENNETT b. 22 May 1832 d. 21 Jun 1858
m. John Clark WELLMAN b. 1832-1836 d. Y
Dicie GRIMES b. 1837 d. 1919 m. Alonzo BENNETT b. 10 Dec 1836 d. 1912

So the math is correct (six sons married six daughters), when it come to Samuel Grimes, but only one child is Susan's; the remainder appear to be Elizabeth's.

Given birth dates from the Elledge Family Tree site, Sarah "Sally" Grimes seems to be the only child of Samuel and Susan. All others were born well after 1815. There is an eight year gap between Sarah and John. This raises questions that I have not yet been able to answer. Did Susan Goble die before 1815? Did they divorce? 
Grimes, Samuel B. (I20239)
 
195 (Source: roger@RoCeMaBra.com; 5/5/2012); Another reference (Kentucky, Statewide - Marriages early to 1800) indicates "Samuel Grimes m. Elizabeth Speer in Shelby Co., KY 10 Aug 1815."

I've looked at various references for Samuel Grimes and Sarah Gobel/Elizabeth Spears, and come to these conclusions (names and dates from Chuck Elledge's "Elledge Family Tree" site):

Probably child of Susan Goble

Sarah "Sally" GRIMES b. 17 Jun 1811 d. 2 Jul 1895 m. James BENNETT, Sr. b. 31 Dec 1819 d. 27 Oct 1891

Probably children of Elizabeth Spears

John GRIMES b. 5 Apr 1819 d. 10 Oct 1899
m. Mary SANDS b. 1820 d. 3 Dec 1859
m. Zeporah SANDS b. 25 Jan 1825 d. 29 Sep 1883
m. Susannah BROWN b. 1824 d. Y

Barbara GRIMES b. 1820 d. 2 Jul 1911
m. William BENNETT b. 5 Oct 1823 d. Y
m. Henry F. ROBBINS d. Bef 1841
Leonard GRIMES b. 1825 d. 1870-1880 m. Philena J. MONK b. 1831 d. Y
Elizabeth GRIMES b. 1826 d. Y m. Jesse Edward MORGAN b. 1823 d. Y
Benjamin A. GRIMES b. 1827-1828 d. Y m. Menerva PARKS b. 1834 d. 1909
Samuel GRIMES b. 1830 d. 1913 m. Arrabelle HUNT b. 1832 d. Y
Abraham GRIMES b. 1831 d. Y m. Sarah PRUETT b. 1833 d. Y
Nancy GRIMES b. 1832-1834 d. Y m. George Washington BENNETT b. 17 May 1827 d. 1912
Katherine "Kitty" GRIMES b. 1835 d. 1910
m. Harrison BENNETT b. 22 May 1832 d. 21 Jun 1858
m. John Clark WELLMAN b. 1832-1836 d. Y
Dicie GRIMES b. 1837 d. 1919 m. Alonzo BENNETT b. 10 Dec 1836 d. 1912

So the math is correct (six sons married six daughters), when it come to Samuel Grimes, but only one child is Susan's; the remainder appear to be Elizabeth's.

Given birth dates from the Elledge Family Tree site, Sarah "Sally" Grimes seems to be the only child of Samuel and Susan. All others were born well after 1815. There is an eight year gap between Sarah and John. This raises questions that I have not yet been able to answer. Did Susan Goble die before 1815? Did they divorce? 
Grimes, Abraham (I20240)
 
196 (Source: roger@RoCeMaBra.com; 5/5/2012); Another reference (Kentucky, Statewide - Marriages early to 1800) indicates "Samuel Grimes m. Elizabeth Speer in Shelby Co., KY 10 Aug 1815."

I've looked at various references for Samuel Grimes and Sarah Gobel/Elizabeth Spears, and come to these conclusions (names and dates from Chuck Elledge's "Elledge Family Tree" site):

Probably child of Susan Goble

Sarah "Sally" GRIMES b. 17 Jun 1811 d. 2 Jul 1895 m. James BENNETT, Sr. b. 31 Dec 1819 d. 27 Oct 1891

Probably children of Elizabeth Spears

John GRIMES b. 5 Apr 1819 d. 10 Oct 1899
m. Mary SANDS b. 1820 d. 3 Dec 1859
m. Zeporah SANDS b. 25 Jan 1825 d. 29 Sep 1883
m. Susannah BROWN b. 1824 d. Y

Barbara GRIMES b. 1820 d. 2 Jul 1911
m. William BENNETT b. 5 Oct 1823 d. Y
m. Henry F. ROBBINS d. Bef 1841
Leonard GRIMES b. 1825 d. 1870-1880 m. Philena J. MONK b. 1831 d. Y
Elizabeth GRIMES b. 1826 d. Y m. Jesse Edward MORGAN b. 1823 d. Y
Benjamin A. GRIMES b. 1827-1828 d. Y m. Menerva PARKS b. 1834 d. 1909
Samuel GRIMES b. 1830 d. 1913 m. Arrabelle HUNT b. 1832 d. Y
Abraham GRIMES b. 1831 d. Y m. Sarah PRUETT b. 1833 d. Y
Nancy GRIMES b. 1832-1834 d. Y m. George Washington BENNETT b. 17 May 1827 d. 1912
Katherine "Kitty" GRIMES b. 1835 d. 1910
m. Harrison BENNETT b. 22 May 1832 d. 21 Jun 1858
m. John Clark WELLMAN b. 1832-1836 d. Y
Dicie GRIMES b. 1837 d. 1919 m. Alonzo BENNETT b. 10 Dec 1836 d. 1912

So the math is correct (six sons married six daughters), when it come to Samuel Grimes, but only one child is Susan's; the remainder appear to be Elizabeth's.

Given birth dates from the Elledge Family Tree site, Sarah "Sally" Grimes seems to be the only child of Samuel and Susan. All others were born well after 1815. There is an eight year gap between Sarah and John. This raises questions that I have not yet been able to answer. Did Susan Goble die before 1815? Did they divorce? 
Grimes, Nancy (I20241)
 
197 (Source: Ron, On your Rootsweb entry #20033, the person, Sarah A.,buried next to Michael is Sarah Angeline Mills,daughter of Robert Frederick & Elizabeth Bowman Mills, b. Feb. 4, 1844 d. May 16, 1911 buried at the old Bowman, now Pilot Knob Cemetery. Mother of Mary Elizabeth, Melissa Gertrude, Charles A. Sarah C., James M. and Catie. Hope this helps. harebowman@yahoo.com Harry E. Bowman)

NAME: Melissa G Froman AGE IN 1870: 5 BIRTH YEAR: abt 1865 BIRTHPLACE: Indiana HOME IN 1870: Whiskey Run, Crawford, Indiana RACE: White GENDER: Female POST OFFICE: Milltown VALUE OF REAL ESTATE: View image HOUSEHOLD MEMBERS: NAME AGE Michael C Froman 32 Sarah A Froman 26 Melissa G Froman 5 Charles A Froman 1 Save Ignore Source Citation Year: 1870; Census Place: Whiskey Run, Crawford, Indiana; Roll: M593_306; Page: 134B; Image: 272; Family History Library Film: 545805

NAME: Melina G. Froman AGE: 16 BIRTH YEAR: abt 1864 BIRTHPLACE: Indiana HOME IN 1880: Whiskey Run, Crawford, Indiana RACE: White GENDER: Female RELATION TO HEAD OF HOUSE: Daughter MARITAL STATUS: Single FATHER'S NAME: M. C. Froman FATHER'S BIRTHPLACE: Indiana MOTHER'S NAME: Sarah A. Froman MOTHER'S BIRTHPLACE: Indiana NEIGHBORS: View others on page OCCUPATION: At Home CANNOT READ/WRITE: BLIND: DEAF AND DUMB: OTHERWISE DISABLED: IDIOTIC OR INSANE: View image HOUSEHOLD MEMBERS: NAME AGE M. C. Froman 42 Sarah A. Froman 36 Melina G. Froman 16 Charles A. Froman 11 Elizabeth Mills 50 Save Ignore Source Citation Year: 1880; Census Place: Whiskey Run, Crawford, Indiana; Roll: 270; Family History Film: 1254270; Page: 274B; Enumeration District: 023; Image: 0786

Melissa G. Froman Spencer Birth: Aug. 16, 1865 Death: May 28, 1886 Burial: Pilot Knob Cemetery Pilot Knob Crawford County Indiana, USA Plot: Created by: Harry Bowman Record added: Nov 02, 2002 Find A Grave Memorial# 6900916 
Froman, Melissa Gertrude (I5653)
 
198 (Source: Ron, On your Rootsweb entry #20033, the person, Sarah A.,buried next to Michael is Sarah Angeline Mills,daughter of Robert Frederick & Elizabeth Bowman Mills, b. Feb. 4, 1844 d. May 16, 1911 buried at the old Bowman, now Pilot Knob Cemetery. Mother of Mary Elizabeth, Melissa Gertrude, Charles A. Sarah C., James M. and Catie. Hope this helps. harebowman@yahoo.com Harry E. Bowman)

Charles A. Froman Birth: Feb. 16, 1869 Crawford County Indiana, USA Death: Jul. 30, 1910 Evansville Vanderburgh County Indiana, USA Family links: Parents: Michael C. Froman (1838 - 1923) Sarah Angeline Mills Froman (1844 - 1911) Spouse: Jessie A. Archibald Froman (1873 - 1969)* Children: Homer Froman (1893 - 1974)* Zenor Froman (1894 - 1981)* Siblings: Melissa G. Froman Spencer (1865 - 1886)* Charles A. Froman (1869 - 1910) James M. Froman (1875 - 1876)* *Calculated relationship Burial: Pilot Knob Cemetery Pilot Knob Crawford County Indiana, USA Plot: Created by: Harry Bowman Record added: Nov 02, 2002 Find A Grave Memorial# 6900909 
Froman, Charles Abraham (I14266)
 
199 (Source: Ron, On your Rootsweb entry #20033, the person, Sarah A.,buried next to Michael is Sarah Angeline Mills,daughter of Robert Frederick & Elizabeth Bowman Mills, b. Feb. 4, 1844 d. May 16, 1911 buried at the old Bowman, now Pilot Knob Cemetery. Mother of Mary Elizabeth, Melissa Gertrude, Charles A. Sarah C., James M. and Catie. Hope this helps. harebowman@yahoo.com Harry E. Bowman)

Name: Michael G, Froman Gender: Male Race: White Age: 85 Marital Status: Widowed Birth Date: 8 May 1838 Birth Place: Cranford Co Ind Death Date: 5 May 1923 Death Place: Whiskey Run, Crawford, Indiana, USA Father: James F Froman Mother: Crider Froman Spouse: Sarah Froman 
Froman, Michael C. (I14268)
 
200 (Source: Ron, On your Rootsweb entry #20033, the person, Sarah A.,buried next to Michael is Sarah Angeline Mills,daughter of Robert Frederick & Elizabeth Bowman Mills, b. Feb. 4, 1844 d. May 16, 1911 buried at the old Bowman, now Pilot Knob Cemetery. Mother of Mary Elizabeth, Melissa Gertrude, Charles A. Sarah C., James M. and Catie. Hope this helps. harebowman@yahoo.com Harry E. Bowman) Froman, Mary Elizabeth (I14269)
 

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